Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery

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Conoco and Phillips 66 announced on November 18, 2001 that their boards of directors had unanimously approved a definitive agreement for a "merger of equals". The merged company, ConocoPhillips, became the third-largest integrated U.S. energy company based on market capitalization and oil and gas reserves and production. On November 11, 2011 ConocoPhillips announced that Phillips 66 would be the name of a new independent oil and gasoline refining and marketing firm, created as ConocoPhillips split into two companies. ConocoPhillips kept the current name of the company and concentrated on oil exploration and production side while Phillips 66 included refining, marketing, midstream, and chemical portions of the company. Photo: Hugh Pickens all rights reserved.

by Hugh Pickens, Ponca City Oklahoma


The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of Phillips 66 that documents and explains the company's business strategy and execution of that strategy.

Major Sections of this report on Phillips 66 include:

Safety, Environment, Legal


Corporate


Strategic and Financial


Business Segments


Stock Market


Reference

Refining Business Segment


Increasing Profitability in Refining Business Segment


Detailed Look at Ponca City Refinery


Other Phillips Refineries


Other Locations


Contents

Master Index of Articles about Phillips 66

The 587 foot tall Mammoet PTC 140 crane, seen here from North First Street, towers over the Refinery Complex in Ponca City. The supercrane was used to move two new 232 ton coker reactor units within the refinery on September 29, 2013. Phillips was willing to invest $70 million in the two new coker reactor units because the Ponca City Refinery is one of the best run, safest, and most profitable of Phillips' fifteen worldwide refineries and Garland wants the refinery in Ponca City to continue to run smoothly and profitably. This photograph of the supercrane in Ponca City was taken from almost two miles away from the crane. Photo: Hugh Pickens All Rights Reserved.
Hugh Pickens, an analyst who closely follows Phillips 66, speaks with Phillips CEO Greg Garland (right) about the disposition of the North Tower, South Tower, and Research West at Phillips' Ponca City Refinery after Garland's speech to the Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce on August 13, 2014.

by Hugh Pickens, Ponca City Oklahoma


The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of Phillips 66 that documents and explains the company's business strategy and execution of that strategy.

Major Sections of this report on Phillips 66 include:

Safety, Environment, Legal


Corporate


Strategic and Financial


Business Segments


Stock Market


Reference

Refining Business Segment


Increasing Profitability in Refining Business Segment


Detailed Look at Ponca City Refinery


Other Phillips Refineries


Other Locations


Alliance Refinery

The Alliance Refinery, located on the Mississippi River in Belle Chasse, La., 25 miles south of New Orleans, has a crude oil capacity of 247 MBD and processes mainly light, low-sulfur crude oil. Alliance receives domestic crude oil from the Gulf of Mexico via pipeline and foreign crude oil from West Africa via pipeline connected to the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port. The single-train refinery’s facilities include fluid catalytic cracking, hydrodesulfurization units, a reformer and aromatics units that enable it to produce a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. Other products include petrochemical feedstocks, home heating oil and anode petroleum coke.The majority of the refined products are distributed to customers in the southeastern and eastern United States through major common-carrier pipeline systems and by barge.[1] Photo by eustatic Flicker Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
Flooding at the Alliance Refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana after Hurricane Isaac. Greg Garland told investors and securities analysts at the 2012 Barclays CEO Energy-Power Conference in New York on September 5, 2012 that Isaac went right over the top of the Alliance refinery. "We got back in the refinery on Wednesday afternoon. Some minor damage in terms of insulation blown off of towers, but really the refinery came through in really good shape. Back side of the storm created flooding in Plaquemines Parish. It overran a levy. We had about a 100 foot breach in our dike. So we got water into the refinery. By Thursday afternoon, we had managed to breach that. But we had about a foot to a foot and a half of water in the refinery." Photo: Lower Mississippi Riverkeeper Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Description of Alliance Refinery

The Alliance Refinery, located on the Mississippi River in Belle Chasse, La., 25 miles south of New Orleans, has a crude oil capacity of 247 MBD and processes mainly light, low-sulfur crude oil. Alliance receives domestic crude oil from the Gulf of Mexico via pipeline and foreign crude oil from West Africa via pipeline connected to the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port. The single-train refinery’s facilities include fluid catalytic cracking, hydrodesulfurization units, a reformer and aromatics units that enable it to produce a high percentage of transportation fuels, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. Other products include petrochemical feedstocks, home heating oil and anode petroleum coke.The majority of the refined products are distributed to customers in the southeastern and eastern United States through major common-carrier pipeline systems and by barge.[2]

News and Views on Alliance Refinery

May 24, 2018: Protesters Arrested at Work Site of Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline

The New Orleans Times-Picayune reported on May 24, 2018 that two protesters were arrested at a Bayou Bridge Pipeline work site in St. James Parish on May 2, 2018 after about 20 protesters participated in blocking construction in response to the state's decision to appeal a judge's ruling against the pipeline. "St. James residents haven't been listened to," Alicia Cooke, one of the two women arrested, said in a statement. "We've been fighting this pipeline on every level through every legal means for over a year. I'm not sure how many more ways Louisianans can say we don't want this or need this." Protesters from the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, 350 New Orleans and other groups have been monitoring construction and reporting suspected permit violations. Blocking bulldozers and other heavy equipment on Thursday was an attempt to "enforce the law that (DNR) is failing to enforce," the Bucket Brigade said in a statement.

A spokeswoman for Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners, which is building the pipeline jointly with Phillips 66, said work is being done according to state- and federally-approved permits. "Our construction activities have been and will continue to adhere to the stipulations of our permits," Energy Transfer's Alexis Daniel said in an email. "Our commitment to the safe construction and operation of this pipeline remains unchanged."[3]

May 22, 2018: Construction of Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline Continues in Defiance of Judge

Courthouse News reported on May 22, 2018 that construction of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline through sensitive coastal lands continued despite a state judge’s ruling that the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources illegally issued a permit for it. The Bayou Bridge Pipeline is jointly owned by Energy Transfer Partners, which merged with Sunoco in 2012, and Phillips 66. State Judge Alvin Turner Jr., of the 23rd Judicial District Court in St. James Parish, ruled April 30 that the permit for construction through a coastal zone violated state law. On May 15, Judge Turner reiterated that construction through the zone must stop. In siding with plaintiffs, including HELP St. James, Gulf Coast Restoration Network, The Atchafalaya Basinkeeper and BOLD Louisiana, Judge Turner found that the department did not apply state-mandated guidelines that direct the activities of companies involved in oil and gas, a fact he called “troubling.” Turner found that construction of the pipeline will leave St. James residents without an emergency and evacuation route in the event of a chemical spill. And a chemical spill, according to statistics, is likely.

Anne Rolfes, founding director of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, said the Department of Natural Resources is turning a blind eye to environmental violations while another state agency is trying desperately to save the coast. “The state is speaking out of both sides of its mouth,” Rolfes said later in an email. “On the one hand pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into a coastal zone program, and yet looking the other way as Bayou Bridge Pipeline LLC digs up and destroys [the coast]. The Department of Natural Resources is giving Bayou Bridge a pass to damage the coastal zone and suffer no consequences.”[4]

May 7, 2018: Judge Rules Permit for Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline is Illegal

The New Orleans Times Picayune reported on May 7, 2018 that the Louisiana state Department of Natural Resources violated provisions of a state law designed to protect the public and environment in issuing a coastal use permit for construction of the controversial Bayou Bridge Pipeline, and the permit must be reconsidered, according to a state district court judge in St. James Parish. The state agency overseeing the pipeline permit eliminated state-required environmental and safety protections for neighborhoods in St. James Parish and coastal areas that the pipeline will pass through by improperly applying provisions of the state's Coastal Zone Management Act, 23rd Judicial District Court Judge Alvin Turner Jr. ruled in his April 26 decision, made public Monday (May 7).

"We do not typically comment on pending or current litigation," said Energy Transfer Partners spokeswoman Vicki Granado. "We would like to reiterate, however, that we will continue to follow all of the stipulations of our permits, as we have always done."

Two St. James residents among those filing the suit praised the ruling in a press release announcing the decision. "It seems like the state agency didn't think too much about the people who live here when it was giving Bayou Bridge this permit, and neither did Bayou Bridge," said Harry Joseph Sr., pastor of Mount Triumph Baptist Church in St. James. "So we went to court, to somebody who we felt would listen to us, and he did." "Here in St. James, we are in desperate need for an evacuation plan that will allow us to get out fast when something spills or explodes," said Genevieve Butler, a St. James resident. "More facilities keep coming, and each one puts us at more risk, but none of them want to do anything about our situation. Well, now Bayou Bridge has to step up. I hope all the others see this ruling as a sign that they have to give our community the protection we deserve."

Elizabeth Livingston de Calderon, a supervising attorney with the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic representing environmental and community groups that filed suit challenging the permit, said the ruling will require construction to stop on the 162-mile pipeline until DNR reconsiders the permit, once a formal judgment is issued in the case, which could take another week or so.[5]

March 29, 2018: Equipment on Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline Vandalized

The Advocate reported on March 29, 2018 that vandals cut hydraulic hoses and electrical lines, broke windows and spray painted messages on backhoes and bulldozers on Bayou Bridge construction equipment in Assumption Parish causing estimated damage of at least $50,000 but possibly much more. Deputies are still investigating, though the company has blamed environmental extremists based on some of the spray painting. Company officials declined to say what was spray painted on the construction equipment. "We understand there will always be varying opinions about critical infrastructure projects like the Bayou Bridge Pipeline and we respect the rights of all to peacefully protest, however destruction of equipment is not peaceful," the company wrote in a statement on its social media accounts.

Anne Rolfes, founder of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade and one of the familiar faces at previous demonstrations said vandalism is not a tactic her coalition employs. "I don't know who would've done that. We don't condone that type of damage," she said. At the same time, "I'm not surprised," Rolfes added. Both sides have accused the other of hypocrisy. Pipeline builders argued that damage to equipment or infrastructure can actually harm the environment, though they did not delve into whether that was at issue in the recent case. Rolfes fired back that if Energy Transfer Partners, which owns Bayou Bridge, cares so much about the environment it should bring down the number of spills the company reports.[6]

March 19, 2018: Phillips 66 Proposes 94-mile Pipeline from St. James to its Alliance Refinery

Phillips 66 Proposes 94-mile Pipeline from St. James to its Alliance Refinery. Phillips 66 wants to build another 94-mile crude oil pipeline from what it calls the St. James oil market hub to its Alliance Refinery in Plaquemines Parish. A significant part of the path of the proposed pipeline would cross through wetlands in the Barataria Basin and Breton Sound Basin, and across Lake Salvador within existing pipeline corridors. Map: Phillips 66 (The map was included in a summary document sent to public officials by the company)

The Times Picayune reported on March 19, 2018 that Phillips 66 wants to build another 94-mile crude oil pipeline from what it calls the St. James oil market hub to its Alliance Refinery in Plaquemines Parish. A significant part of the path of the proposed pipeline would cross through wetlands in the Barataria Basin and Breton Sound Basin, and across Lake Salvador, according to a map accompanying a brief summary provided to local officials by the company earlier this month. However, the proposed route would be within existing pipeline corridors. "The pipeline would provide Louisiana refineries with new access to U.S.-produced crude oil, reducing reliance on foreign crude and keeping them competitive in the global market for energy projects," says a one-page "Ace Pipeline Summary" that's been sent to a number of local government officials.

Anne Rolfes, founding director of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, one of the organizations that has opposed Phillips 66 funded Bayou Bridge pipeline, raised questions about this latest proposal, including the failure to inform the public about the pipeline plans. "This is what corruption looks like: our government helping an out-of-state oil company to secretly expand," she said. "They have done this out of the public eye, with no input, and there's a reason for it: they are polluters, they should be ashamed, they should be banned from Louisiana. Instead our so-called leaders roll out the red carpet. "Nothing about the Bayou Bridge process has been honest - from the secret meeting our governor had with Bayou Bridge employee Mary Landrieu to the claims of providing jobs for locals," Rolfes said. "Up-and-down the pipeline route the license plates of the construction workers are from out of state. It will be the same with this additional section."[7]

March 15, 2018: Appeals Court Allows Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline Construction to Proceed

The Times-Picayune reported on March 15, 2018 that by a two-to-one vote, judges in the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal in New Orleans struck down a ruling by a federal judge in Baton Rouge that had halted the pipeline's construction through the environmentally-sensitive Atchafalaya Basin putting construction of the controversial Bayou Bridge oil pipeline back on track. Judge Edith Brown Clement wrote that the district court "abused its discretion in granting a preliminary injunction" halting the pipeline's construction. The district court should have allowed the case to proceed with the Army Corps of Engineers providing its reasons for permitting the pipeline, she wrote. Environmental groups opposed to the pipeline say they'll appeal Thursday's decision.

One of the three appeals court judges filed a dissenting opinion. Judge W. Eugene Davis agreed with Dick that the Corps had not explained how the company's mitigation plan would reduce the pipeline's impacts. The Corps "must explain how the out-of-kind mitigation measures replace the 'lost functions and services' of the bald-cypress/tupelo swamp," Davis wrote.[8]

March 1, 2018: Judge Explains Why She Stopped Construction Through Atchafalaya Swamp of Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline

Courthouse News service reported on March 1, 2018 that U.S. District Judge Shelly Dick said the Bayou Bridge Pipline, funded in part by Phillips 66, threatens the health and longevity of the Atchafalaya Basin, the largest river swamp in North America and agreed with environmentalists who filed the lawsuit that the centuries-old cypress and tupelo trees in the path of the pipeline are irreplaceable. “While an injunction could delay the schedule for this project, it is well established that temporary economic harm does not outweigh permanent environmental degradation such as loss of forests – especially ancient trees – or damage to wetlands,” Judge Dick wrote. Dick’s order halted all work in the Atchafalaya Basin until the case has been tried. Company attorneys said the Corps of Engineers’ permit requires Bayou Bridge Pipeline to restore the Basin’s “pre-existing wetland contours and conditions” when the project is done. However, Judge Dick said the Corps of Engineers did not show it took into consideration past and present cumulative environmental impacts. “The Corps’ and BBP’s [Bayou Bridge Pipeline’s] myopic view that they are only required to consider the impacts of this singular project is not consistent with the regulations or applicable jurisprudence,” Dick wrote.

Dick noted in her order that documents show the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality raised concerns that running the pipeline through the Atchafalaya “would add to the cumulative effect of ecologically detrimental hydrologic alteration, and the pipeline would obstruct planned efforts to restore hydrologic function.” Plaintiffs said the Corp’s plans to mitigate wetland losses did not measure up to what is lawfully required. Judge Dick agreed. Typically, environmental mitigation programs are undertaken in the same region as the project that caused the environmental destruction. Plaintiffs showed they had proposed that the Corps of Engineers require Bayou Bridge Pipeline to clean up spoil banks left in the wetlands from previous pipeline constructions that did not follow state and federal protocol. Instead, however, the Corps required Bayou Bridge to purchase environmental mitigation credits for projects far away from the Atchafalaya Basin, in violation of regulation, Dick found.[9]

February 26, 2018: Appeals Begin to Halt Work Stoppage on Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline, Say Cost is Almost $1 M Per Day

Federal Judges Stops Construction of Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline U.S. District Court Judge Shelly Dick has issued an order prohibiting the companies building the Bayou Bridge pipeline from continuing construction. The judge's order has halted construction of the pipeline planned through the heart of the Atchafalaya Basin, granting the request of environmental groups opposed to the project. In the order issuing a preliminary injunction, Dick wrote that she was enjoining further work on the pipeline "in order to prevent further irreparable harm until this matter can be tried on the merits." Photo: Wikimedia - A home made stop sign replacement after Hurricane Katrina (New Orleans)

The Advocate reported on February 26, 2018 that according to ETP spokeman Alexis Daniel construction within the Atchafalaya Basin has stopped on Bayou Bridge Pipeline, a $700 million joint venture between Energy Transfer Partners and Phillips 66. Bayou Bridge lawyers have asked the judge to suspend her work stoppage order, saying the construction halt would cost the company almost $1 million daily. They have asked Judge Dick to resolve that request by Tuesday and want the suspension of the work stoppage while they pursue an appeal with the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. In Bayou Bridge’s motion, lawyers argued that Judge Dick could not have meant to stop work on the entire pipeline's length. They noted the environmental groups that sued last month over the line have only argued about the line’s potential effect on the Atchafalaya. The attorneys also noted that Dick's two-page order did not specify its breadth, saying it enjoined "in only the most general terms 'further action on this project.'" The lawyers added that if the order does extend to the entire project, the cost to Bayou Bridge Pipeline LLC would be as much as $1.675 million per day.

The plaintiffs in the suit and the protesters who gathered Monday in Belle Rose are both battling Bayou Bridge, but to different ends. Much of the testimony in the suit discussed the harm being done to the Atchafalaya Swamp. The plaintiffs urged the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to order the pipeline company to perform meaningful work to offset the damage locally, such as by repairing existing oil infrastructure. The protesters, meanwhile, viewed the pipeline as inherently unsafe and demanded its complete removal. Margaret Logue, 23, one of three protesters who refused to leave the Belle Rose-area construction site off La. 70 and was later arrested Monday, called on Bayou Bridge and the state government to respond to their demands. “We believe in the power of the people to stand up peacefully and prayerfully against a government and a company that have proven themselves unwilling to and incapable of protecting our greatest treasures: our water, our air, our land and our people,” she said.[10]

February 23, 2018: Federal Judges Stops Construction of Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline

This Month's Top Story: Phillips 66 Benefits from $2.7 Billion Federal Tax Break from Donald Trump. Phillips 66 reported fourth-quarter 2017 earnings of $3.2 billion, benefiting from $2.7 billion in federal tax changes. Excluding that tax change, adjusted earnings in Q4 were $548 million, compared with $858 million in Q3, the company said. Phillips 66 had been expecting, and listing on its balance sheet, future tax liability that it will no longer have to deal with because of President Donald Trumps' recent tax reform bill. Read the Story Photo: Gage Skidmore Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The Advocate reported on February 23, 2018 that U.S. District Court Judge Shelly Dick has issued an order prohibiting the companies building the Bayou Bridge pipeline from continuing construction. The judge's order has halted construction of the pipeline planned through the heart of the Atchafalaya Basin, granting the request of environmental groups opposed to the project. In the order issuing a preliminary injunction, Dick wrote that she was enjoining further work on the pipeline "in order to prevent further irreparable harm until this matter can be tried on the merits." “The court’s ruling recognizes the serious threat this pipeline poses to the Atchafalaya Basin, one of our country’s ecological and cultural crown jewels,” Jan Hasselman, an Earthjustice attorney, said in a statement. “For now, at least, the Atchafalaya is safe from this company’s incompetence and greed.” Alexis Daniel, spokeman for Energy Transfer Partners, a joint owner of the pipeline project, declined comment. "The Judge did not issue any opinion explaining her order. Until such time as that is issued, and we can review, we will have no further comment."

Construction on the $175 million, 162-mile pipeline has already begun. The line would transport crude from Lake Charles, home to Phillips 66's Westlake Refinery, to St. James, Louisiana, connecting to an existing line that originates in Nederland, Texas. The project is 60 percent owned by Energy Transfer with the remainder owned by refiner Phillips 66. Once complete, the Bayou Bridge system will have capacity to transport up to 480,000 barrels of oil per day to refineries along the Mississippi River. It is projected to start service by the second half of 2018. The line also would move oil from Texas and as far as North Dakota, through connections with Energy Transfer’s Dakota Access, to Gulf Coast refiners. Louisiana is home to around 3.5 million barrels per day of refining capacity, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Energy Transfer’s 1,172-mile (1,885-km) Dakota Access crude pipeline was thrust into the spotlight following massive protests near its construction site in North Dakota. Although protesters were able to temporarily halt construction, it began service in mid-2017.[11][12]

Pipeline attorney William Scherman previously said in a story published Feburary 8, 2018 that Bayou Bridge is prepared to spend $20 million to perform offsetting environmental projects known as wetlands mitigation. However, Scott Eustis, community science director for the Gulf Restoration Network, testified the mitigation would take place 55 miles away. Clemson ecology professor William Conner said the project the Corps agreed to would replant bottomland hardwood forests, not swamps. "It's two different kinds of forest performing two different kinds of function. … I don't think the mitigation will replace what is going to be cut, simple as that," Conner said on the stand.[13]

February 8, 2018: Opponents of Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline Clear Legal Hurdle to Stop Construction

The Advocate reported on February 8, 2018 that U.S. District Court Judge Shelly Dick has kept a fight alive to shut down construction of the Bayou Bridge pipeline, funded in part by Phillips 66, determining that allowing construction to continue would cause "irreparable harm" because construction crews would continue cutting down centuries-old cypress trees. Dick has yet to determine if the plaintiffs have a chance of winning the suit to pull the permit but indicated she would make a ruling Friday following more arguments. Opponents are asking U.S. District Court Judge Shelly Dick to block construction while the court considers rescinding a necessary U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit. Should the suit continue, the judge determined, there would be reason to halt construction while the full matter is argued. Having cleared that hurdle, the plaintiffs, represented by attorneys from the nonprofit Earthjustice, will now have to demonstrate that the Corps was wrong to issue the permit.

Pipeline attorney William Scherman said Bayou Bridge is prepared to spend $20 million to perform offsetting environmental projects known as wetlands mitigation. However, Scott Eustis, community science director for the Gulf Restoration Network, testified the mitigation would take place 55 miles away. Clemson ecology professor William Conner said the project the Corps agreed to would replant bottomland hardwood forests, not swamps. "It's two different kinds of forest performing two different kinds of function. … I don't think the mitigation will replace what is going to be cut, simple as that," Conner said on the stand.[14]

February 7, 2018: Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline Rerouted Around Resistance Camp

Truth Out reported on February 7, 2018 that the controversial Bayou Bridge pipeline, funded in part by Phillips 66, has been rerouted to go around the L'eau Est La Vie resistance camp. Located southwest of Baton Rouge, the camp lies on land purchased in December by pipeline opponents, who call themselves water protectors. It is thought to be the first time that water protectors have purchased land that lies in the path of a proposed pipeline. Water protectors have been camping out at L'eau Est La Vie since December, protecting the land and preparing it to be used by the surrounding communities as a hub for environmental education and sustainable agriculture.

Energy Transfer Partners confirmed the pipeline will go around the camp. "In this case, we were able to adjust the route to increase our co-location with other utilities in the area," said Alexis Daniel, a spokesperson for Energy Transfer Partners.[15]

January 25, 2018: Judge Rules Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline LLC Can Keep Land-Grab Records Secret

Courthouse News reported on January 25, 2018 that Bayou Bridge Pipeline LLC, funded in part by Phillips 66, has no obligation under the state’s public-records law to hand over documents about its claim to easements across hundreds of residents’ private properties. “There is nothing that shows here that the records plaintiffs seek are public records,” East Baton Rouge District Court Judge Michael Caldwell said in his ruling from the bench. In a lawsuit filed last week on behalf of the groups by the New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights, the environmentalists claimed 400 parcels of private property are being taken for the construction of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline. Three environmental groups – Atchafalaya Basin Keeper, Louisiana Bucket Brigade and 350 New Orleans – argued before Judge Caldwell that records about Bayou Bridge Pipeline LLC’s land grabs along the route of the proposed pipeline must be disclosed. Bayou Bridge Pipeline LLC has tried to seize even unwilling homeowners’ land on the pretext “it has legal authority to exercise eminent domain and take private property because it is a ‘common carrier’ under Louisiana law and that its proposed pipeline is ‘in the public interest and necessity,’” according to the complaint. Judge Caldwell ruled that because BBP is neither a nonprofit nor an entity of the state, it is under no obligation to turn over records about its eminent-domain requests. Before handing down his decision, Caldwell acknowledged the pipeline is a “hot topic” and a “matter of great public interest.” “But what is before me today does not address the merits – whether the pipeline is or is not a good idea,” the judge said. “It is only a public-records request.”[16]

January 11, 2018: Groups Sue To Stop Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline, Which Received Permit For Greater Capacity Than Publicized

Groups Sue To Stop Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline, Which Received Permit For Greater Capacity Than Publicize. Louisiana groups including the Louisiana Crawfish Producers Association, West; Gulf Restoration Network; Waterkeeper Alliance; and Sierra Club have sued the US Corps of Engineers to stop the Bayou Bridge pipeline project claiming claims that the Corps violated federal environmental laws in its approval of the project.

KATC reported on January 11, 2018 that several Louisiana groups including the Louisiana Crawfish Producers Association, West; Gulf Restoration Network; Waterkeeper Alliance; and Sierra Club have sued the US Corps of Engineers to stop the Bayou Bridge pipeline project claiming claims that the Corps violated federal environmental laws in its approval of the project. The National Environmental Policy Act requires agencies to prepare an environmental impact statement for "major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment." The plaintiffs claim that the Corps disregarded a lot when it found the project would have no significant impact, like the pipeline company's spill record and the project's potential impacts on flooding and restoration projects, among other factors. The plaintiffs claim the Corps also failed to consider alternatives to the proposed project, as NEPA requires, like connecting to existing pipelines or a "restoration alternative" that would require the company to remove legacy spoil banks in the Basin.

“We have a right to a healthy environment. If the Cajun people of Louisiana had challenged the first pipeline when it came through Louisiana, we wouldn't be facing the environmental mess that we have in coastal Louisiana and the Atchafalaya Basin,” Jody Meche, a commercial crawfisherman with the Louisiana Crawfish Producer's Association, West, stated in the release. “It is the right thing to do to challenge the construction of a new pipeline by Energy Transfer Partners, which has a track record of flagrantly violating environmental laws.”

As proposed, Bayou Bridge was to carry up to 280,000 barrels of oil a day, but the final permit allows the project to carry up to 480,000 barrels of oil — another issue with which the plaintiffs take issue. "This dramatic increase in capacity within a fixed pipeline diameter has significant consequences for the risks of spills, and their impacts. However, these consequences were neither disclosed nor analyzed by the Corps in the permitting process," the suit claims, also adding that the existing pipeline system is operating under capacity — even as it was described as critical infrastructure.[17]

December 6, 2017: Worker Burned by Sulphuric Acid at Phillips 66's Alliance Refinery

Reuters reported on December 6, 2017 that an operator was burned by sulfuric acid on Tuesday while performing maintenance on a boiler at Phillips 66’s Alliance Refinery. Phillips 66 spokeswoman Melissa Ory said a worker from the Alliance refinery was treated for minor injuries at a local hospital and released.[18]

October 18, 2017: Opponents of Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline Push for Study Request

WRKF reported on October 18, 2017 that environmental groups in Louisiana, like the Louisiana Bucket Brigade and BOLD Louisiana, oppose the proposed 162-mile pipeline,funded in part by Phillips 66 and are spending their lunch hours demonstrating in front of the Governor's Mansion every Tuesday this month. They're asking the governor to request an environmental impact study from the Army Corps of Engineers before allowing the pipeline, which will cross 11 parishes and the Atchafalaya Basin, to proceed. Louisiana Governor Edwards says while he understands many are passionately opposed to this pipeline, it's not crossing virgin territory, so to speak. It will be constructed adjacent to other pipelines already in place across the Atchafalaya. “I believe pipelines can be built – if all of the regulations and permit requirements are followed – in a way where you don’t interfere with the flow of water and the movement of wildlife,” Gov. Edwards states.

But Cherri Foytlin, BOLD's state director, notes Energy Transfer Partners, responsible for this pipeline and the Dakota Access pipeline, has a dismal track record with rules and safety. “Florida Pipeline, which is already in the Basin, and owned by Energy Transfer Partners, is already out of compliance. The Dakota Access Pipeline leaked three times – three times already!” she says. “And Phillips 66, another partner in Bayou Bridge, had a pipeline fire just this past February, which injured two workers and killed a third.” Foytlin suggests the state could use the time they’re waiting on the environmental impact study to urge the companies involved to actually follow the rules. “We have actually really good laws on the books. It’s just this state doesn’t tend to hold companies accountable to do what they’re supposed to do,” Foytlin says.” I don’t think it’s too much to ask that this industry – but in particular this company – cleans up its mess in the first place before they’re allowed to do another project. I mean, I would make my kids clean up before they get more toys out, right?”[19]

October 8, 2017: Phillips 66's Alliance Refinery Undamaged After Hurricane Nate

Reuters reported on October 8, 2017 that Phillips 66’s Alliance Refinery was undamaged by the passage of Hurricane Nate on Saturday night and may begin restarting some units on Sunday, sources familiar with plant operations said. It may be mid-week at the earliest before the refinery resumes production. There is limited crude oil availability following the shutdown of 92 percent of crude oil production in the Gulf of Mexico, the sources said.[20]

October 7, 2017: Phillips 66 shuts Alliance Refinery Ahead of Hurricane Nate

Reuters reported on October 7, 2017 that Phillips 66 shut its Alliance Refinery ahead of the approach of Hurricane Nate, sources familiar with plant operations said. Only the boilers and the wastewater treatment system are still in operation at the refinery, the sources said. Alliance Refinery was not affected by August’s Hurricane Harvey, which shut all Texas Gulf Coast refineries, accounting for about a quarter of U.S. capacity.[21]

September 19, 2017: Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery Donates $30,000 grant to the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana (CRCL)

The Plaquemines Gazette reported on September 19, 2017 that Phillips 66 has made a $30,000 grant to the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana (CRCL) to fund a major habitat restoration project in Plaquemines Parish. On Sept. 9, more than 30 Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery employees and volunteers from the local area took part in a planting event at the Bayou Dupont Terrace Project. The group planted 4,500 plugs of native marsh grass which will help redevelop part of our coastline and provide improved natural flood defense.[22]

September 3, 2017: Phillips 66 Requests Jones Act Waiver to Supply Alliance Refinery

Reuters reported on September 3, 2017 that Phillips 66 has requested a Jones Act waiver to allow it to use foreign vessels to move crude or products to and from its 260,000-barrel-per-day Alliance refinery in Louisiana after Hurricane Harvey. The Jones Act requires all goods transported by water between U.S. ports be carried on U.S.-flag ships, constructed in the United States, owned by U.S. citizens, and crewed by U.S. citizens. Waivers can only be granted based on interest of national defense such as national emergencies.[23]

September 2, 2017: Workers Repair Levee Breach Near Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery

WDSU reported on September 2, 2017 that Plaquemines Parish officials are working to repair a levee that breached near Phillips 66's Alliance Refinery during tidal surge caused by Hurricane Harvey. Parish officials said the breach does not pose a risk of flooding to homes or Louisiana Highway 23 near the refinery. Officials said the land is remote and not easily accessible. Parish and DOTD personnel spent the day filling Hesco Baskets and transporting them to the landing zone to stage for air operations while a barge arrived carrying rocks that will be used in the repair. Crews will begin placing the rocks into the breach throughout the night, officials said.

This is not the first time the levee has breached. In 2016, the Louisiana National Guard helped the parish place sandbags to repair the levee. Officials said the breach grew to about 70 feet wide when the levee broke last spring.[24]

January 17, 2017: Environmental Groups Gear Up for Second Hearing Against Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline

400 Come Out to Protest Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline. “This is like 50 times the amount of people we have at most of these meetings,” said Scott Eustis, adding that the proposed pipeline was “the biggest and baddest I’ve seen in my career”. Now Louisiana environmental groups are gearing up for a second hearing on February 8, 2017. "I expect we will have a bigger turnout, because people are fired up," said Anne Rolfes, director of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade environmental group. "... This opposition is really unprecedented." Photo: Desmogblog

The Advocate reported on January 17, 2017 that Louisiana environmental groups are gearing up for round two in a battle against the proposed 163-mile Bayou Bridge Pipeline, funded in part by Phillips 66, that they say they fear will foul the state's wetlands and water. A public hearing last week in Baton Rouge for a required U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit drew more than 400 people, but activists expect a bigger turnout on February 8, 2017, said Anne Rolfes, "because people are fired up." "... This opposition is really unprecedented."

The subject of next month's hearing is the state Department of Natural Resources permit needed for portions of the pipeline that would pass through state-designated Coastal Zones in St. James and Assumption parishes, said DNR Communications Director Patrick Courreges. DNR began reviewing the permit early last year and initially closed the public comment period in May, but Courreges said the agency decided to hold a public hearing based on the increasing amount of attention the project has received in recent months. "When this project was originally being looked at, there wasn't that much interest," he said. Rolfes said the pipeline company can expect continued protests to block the project, even if it receives the required approvals from regulators who she accused of generally doing "big oil's bidding." "They will not lay this pipeline," she vowed.[25]

January 15, 2017: 400 Come Out to Protest Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline

400 Come Out to Protest Phillips 66 Funded Bayou Bridge Pipeline. “This is like 50 times the amount of people we have at most of these meetings,” said Scott Eustis, adding that the proposed pipeline was “the biggest and baddest I’ve seen in my career”. The project, if approved, will run though 11 parishes and cross around 600 acres of wetlands and 700 bodies of water, including wells that reportedly provide drinking water for some 300,000 families. Graphic: Phillips 66 Investor Presentation, September 2015

The Guardian reported on January 15, 2017 that Scott Eustis, a coastal wetland specialist with the Gulf Restoration Network, was surprised to be joined by more than 400 others when he attended a public hearing in Baton Rouge about the Bayou Bridge Pipeline, a pipeline extension partially funded by Phillips 66 that would run directly through the Atchafalaya Basin, the world’s largest natural swamp. “This is like 50 times the amount of people we have at most of these meetings,” said Eustis, adding that the proposed pipeline was “the biggest and baddest I’ve seen in my career”. The Bayou Bridge Pipeline, if approved, would carry 480,000 barrels of oil per day a final 162 miles across the state to refineries and ports, through eight watersheds and long stretches of fragile wetlands.

At the public hearing in Baton Rouge on Thursday, the first speaker, Cory Farber, project manager of the Bayou Bridge pipeline, said it was expected to create 2,500 temporary jobs. When Farber then said the project would produce 12 permanent jobs, the crowd laughed heartily. “Those who have airboat companies and equipment companies that specialize in putting in equipment, they’re not opposed to pipelines because of the short-term jobs,” said Jody Meche, president of the state Crawfish Producers’ Association, one of dozens who spoke at the hearing. “But once that pipe is in there, the jobs are gone.”

Debate was fierce. Pro-pipeline speakers – oil industry reps, state representatives, a retired Louisiana State University professor – pointed out that many pipelines already run through the Atchafalaya Basin and said pipelines were in general the safest way to transport oil – in the case of the Bayou Bridge pipeline, 280,000 barrels per day of crude to the Gulf coast region, with the potential for 480,000. Where most in attendance worried about potential oil spills and their effect on drinking water, Meche was more concerned with ways existing pipelines have, he said, “crippled” the fishing industry. “They excavated the trench that they put the pipe in and then [they didn’t clean up] and it leaves a dam behind that blocks the water flow,” he said on the microphone, “until there’s not enough oxygen in the water for the crawfish, the fish, or anything.”

Native Americans dotted the crowd, many of them fresh from Standing Rock. “The Native Americans in North Dakota get a lot of credit for showing people their power,” Eustis said. Lifelong Iberia Parish resident Andrea Kilchrist, 71, described the violence she had witnessed at Standing Rock: peaceful protesters battered with sonic grenades, tear gas, mace, and cannons. “If you think this company is not going to do the same thing here — it’s going to do the same thing here,” she warned the room. “I hate pain. I’m afraid of pain and broken bones,” she continued, her voice shaking. “But on that first day, if y’all give that permit, I will be sitting in front of a bulldozer.”

As activists see it, Louisiana residents are starting to really care about environmental issues and, more importantly, to make themselves heard. “A lot of times we don’t get this opportunity to speak up,” said Eustis, still admiring the surprisingly large crowd. “[These oil companies] want to just roll over us. “But after Katrina, and the BP spill, and the Baton Rouge flood last year – 100,000 people displaced from their homes because of climate change – I guess we’re finally just sick of this.”[26][27]

December 23, 2016: Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery Donates $65,000 to Sorrento Fire Department

The Creole reported on December 23, 2016 that Phillips 66 recently donated $50,000 to the Sorrento Fire Department to help with both aging equipment and losses suffered during the August flood with some of the money used to replace a 20-year-old fire truck by matching a grant. Several assets in south Louisiana, including a Sorrento salt cavern in the McElroy Swamp, were acquired by Phillips 66 earlier this year.[28]

August 27, 2016: Plaquemines Parish Tries to Close Levee Breach Near Phillips 66's Alliance Refinery

WWL Tv reported on August 27, 2016 that Plaquemines Parish Emergency Management Officials are on high alert after a breach along the bayou side levee near the Phillips 66's Alliance Refinery raised the alarm for parish leaders. The breach was discovered where a pipeline crosses the levee. Within six hours the breach had reached 20 feet wide, prompting swift response. Plaquemines Parish crews immediately reacted. Generators were on site providing light and started to work getting 2000 pound sandbags into the breach. Low lying areas along Louisiana Highway 23 in Plaquemines parish are at risk for flooding during hurricane season. Earthen levees on either side protect homeowners and industry there. “It is a grave concern of ours, and we are monitoring it every day with the resources that we have,” says Council Chair Kirk Lepine. Emergency management says the breach does not pose a flooding threat to homes or Highway 23 right now. The water is coming in from the Barataria Bay side and moving back into the drainage canal, and then moving back to Barataria Bay.

Lepine says a hurricane could change that and wonders if aging infrastructure can weather a bigger storm. Lepine says he hopes that the levee is inspected every week, but he was not sure. Lepine says with budget cutbacks, levee monitoring is now split between departments. It's something that needs to be addressed. “Before it was inspected every week. And if there were deficiencies in the levee we were notified. We tried to stay on top of it as much as we can."[29][30]

April 16, 2016: Phillips Reports Emissions Due to Equipment Failure at Alliance Refinery

Phillips on Saturday reported a release of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere from a bypass valve due to equipment failure at its Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, according to a filing with the National Response Center.[31]

November 17, 2015: Safway Awarded OSHA VPP Star Status at Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery

Virtual-Strategy Magazine reported on November 17, 2015 that the Safway Services team at the Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery in Belle Chasse, La., has been recognized by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and approved for participation in the Star Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). This premiere recognition program is reserved for employers and employees who demonstrate exemplary achievement in the prevention and control of occupational safety and health hazards and a commitment to continuous improvement of their safety and health management systems. “Achieving this prestigious safety recognition reflects Safway’s commitment to safety,” said Paul Amedee, vice president of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) for Safway Group. “Receiving VPP certification requires a collaborative effort between our client, Phillips 66, and Safway – on every level – from field management to the executive team. I would like to thank everyone at the Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery for helping us reach this important safety milestone.”[32]

September 4, 2015: Phillips Reports Emissions at Belle Chasse Refinery

Phillips Reports Emissions at Belle Chasse Refinery on September 4, 2015.[33]

August 31, 2015: Phillips Says Talks With United Steelworkers Union at Alliance Refinery Are Ongoing

Reuters reported on August 31, 2015 that Phillips 66 said on August 31, 2015 that its talks with the United Steelworkers (USW) for a contract covering the union's hourly workers at Alliance Refinery were continuing. "We have a signed agreement with the union to extend the existing contract at the Alliance Refinery through September 11," said Phillips 66 spokeswoman Lara Burhenn. "In the meantime negotiations will continue in good faith."[34]

August 28, 2015: Workers at Alliance Refinery Reject Phillips Contract Offer

Reuters reported on August 28, 2015 that union workers at Phillips 66's Alliance Refinery rejected a contract offer from Phillips on August 28, 2015, according to an official at the United Steelworkers (USW) which represents the refinery's hourly employees. The workers have continued working on an extension to a previous contract and contract talks continue, said John Link, assistant to the USW Distrcit 13 director. The USW reached a national four-year agrrement with the USW in March, 2015 but the national agreement has to be paired with an agreement with employees at Alliance Refinery over local issues to make the contract for hourly workers at the refinery.[35]

August 7, 2015: Phillips to Boost Reformer Capacity at Alliance Refinery

Phillips plans to boost the capacity of the catalytic reformer by 17,000 b/d to 50,000 b/d at its Alliance, Louisiana refinery this fall, according to a notice filed with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality. The increase is needed along with changes to other units to process increased levels of naphtha coming from rising amounts of shale crude oil being processed at the refinery. The company has asked the department to expedite permitting for the work, which it would like to begin as early as August 31 according to a report from Reuters on August 7, 2015.[36]

July 27, 2015: Phillips Resumes Normal Operations at Alliance Refinery After Unscheduled Outage

Phillips said it resumed normal operations at its Alliance refinery in Belle Chase, Louisiana after a brief, unscheduled outage impacted several units on July 23. The company began restarting the units Friday according to a report from Reuters on July 27, 2015.[37]

July 24, 2015: Alliance Refinery Not Likely to Return to Full Capacity for a Week

Platts reported on July 24, 2015 that US Gulf Coast gasoline differentials showed gains July 24, 2015 for the first time this week on news of a refinery power outage at Phillips Alliance Refinery. "The market is up and [Alliance] is only reason I can see minus 5 cents/gal value," one trader said. Phillips 66 was not immediately available for comment Friday. But sources said the refinery lost power late July 23, 2015, and while it appeared back up on July 24, 2015, it was not likely to return to full capacity for a week.[38]

July 24, 2015: Alliance Refinery Outage Raises US Gulf Coast Gasoline Differentials

Platts reported on July 24, 2015 that US Gulf Coast gasoline differentials showed gains July 24, 2015 for the first time this week on news of a refinery power outage at Phillips Alliance Refinery. "The market is up and [Alliance] is only reason I can see minus 5 cents/gal value," one trader said. Phillips 66 was not immediately available for comment Friday. But sources said the refinery lost power late July 23, 2015, and while it appeared back up on July 24, 2015, it was not likely to return to full capacity for a week.[39]

July 23, 2015: Alliance Refinery Shut Down After Power Outage

Retuers reported on July 23, 2015 that the Alliance Refinery was hit by a power outage on July 23, 2015 and that the entire refinery was reportedly shut down. Power was expected to be restored by 7pm on July 23, 2015.[40]

July 23, 2015: Phillips Restarting Units at Alliance Refinery after Brief Outage

Phillips on Friday said it was in the process of restarting units impacted by a brief, unscheduled outage that, on Thursday, shut parts of its Alliance refinery in Belle Chase, Louisiana. The company said the cause of the outage was being investigated by the local utility provider according to reports from Reuters on July 24, 2015.[41]

May 11, 2015: Phillips Says Restart of Alliance Refinery Completed

Phillips 66 reported that the restart of the Alliance Refinery was complete after the power outage that occurred on May 8. after Power Outage May 8 according to a report from Reuters on May 11, 2015.[42]

May 8, 2015: Phillips 66’s Alliance Refinery Shut after Power Outage

Phillips 66’s Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, had another unscheduled shutdown overnight due to a power outage, but the event only lasted for approximately 20 minutes, the company said on Friday. There were no injuries reported and data indicated no impact offsite, the company said. On Friday morning, there were no power outages in the area reported by power provider Entergy Corp. The plant has now experienced two unplanned shutdowns due to power outages since April 27 according to a report from Reuters on May 8, 2015.[43]

May 8, 2015: Alliance Refinery Shut Down After Power Outage

Reuters reported on May 8, 2015 that the Alliance Refinery was completely shut overnight due to a power outage, traders said citing industry publication ENT. Phillips did not repsond to a request for comment on the outage. No power outage in the area is currently listed by the power provider Entergy so it is possible the latest power snag was a problem internal to the plant.[44]

April 30, 2015: Phillips Says Alliance Refinery Still in Process of Restarting

Phillips said on April 30, 2015 that it was still in the process of restarting Alliance Refinery after a brief power upset on April 27, 2015. A previous attempt was made to restart on April 28, 2015.[45]

April 30, 2015: Extended Turnaround at Alliance Refinery Impacts Phillips Earnings for First Quarter

Businesswire reported on April 30, 2015 that Phillips' refining utilization rates were reduced by the extended turnaround at the Alliance Refinery. Phillips announced first-quarter earnings of $987 million, compared with earnings of $1.1 billion during the fourth quarter of 2014. Adjusted earnings were $834 million, a decrease of $79 million from the fourth quarter of 2014. Refining adjusted earnings were $495 million in the first quarter, compared with $322 million in the fourth quarter of 2014. The improvement was primarily due to higher realized refining margins, partially offset by lower volumes. The increase in margins was largely driven by improved secondary product margins as well as higher gasoline market crack spreads. Secondary product margins improved mainly due to lower crude costs. Crack spreads improved mainly as a result of significantly higher gasoline market cracks in the Western/Pacific. First-quarter gasoline market cracks for that region were $20.21 per barrel, compared with $7.46 per barrel during the fourth quarter of 2014. “Refining market conditions helped us realize the best margins we’ve had over the last two years,” said Greg Garland, chairman and CEO of Phillips 66. “Refining utilization rates were impacted by a heavy turnaround schedule, and were further reduced by the extended turnaround at the Alliance Refinery."[46]

April 30, 2015: Phillips Donates $25,000 for “Catching Rays for Making A’s” Academic Achievement Celebrations at Belle Chasse Middle School

WGNO reported on April 30, 2015 that more than 100 students from Belle Chasse Middle School got a chance to hang out and soak up some at the Belle Chasse YMCA in the first of four special “Catching Rays for Making A’s” academic achievement celebrations. The Sheriff’s Office officials say, “the program is made possible by a generous $25,000 contribution from Phillips 66’s Alliance Refinery. “ The Sheriff’s Office teams up with YMCA of Greater New Orleans, Plaquemines Parish School Board, and Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery to put on the program.[47]

April 28, 2015: Phillips Restarting Its Alliance Refinery after Brief Power Loss

Phillips said it was in the process of restarting its Alliance, Louisiana, refinery on Tuesday following a brief loss of power during strong thunderstorms on Monday according to Reuters on April 28, 2015.[48]

April 27, 2015: Small Fire at Alliance Refinery

WDSU reported on April 27, 2015 that there had been a small fire at Alliance Refinery due to power outages. No one was injured in the fire.[49]

April 14, 2015: Phillips Reports Storm-Related Slowdown at Alliance Refinery

Phillips 66’s Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, was operating on Wednesday after a storm moved through the area, a spokesman said. Refining industry publication Energy News Today (ENT) said Tuesday afternoon that the refinery had a storm-related slowdown in operations, including halted production of a 102,000 b/d catalytic cracker that was in standby mode. ENT also said the refinery would try to resume planned rates through Friday.[50]

April 4, 2015: Phillips 66 Restarts Alliance Refinery after Shutdown Due to Power Loss

Phillips was in the process of restarting its Alliance, Louisiana refinery on Monday after it was shut on Saturday due to power loss. The refinery also reported a release of materials due to the power loss, according to a filing with the National Response Center.[51]

February 25, 2015: Union of Concerned Scientists Sends Letter to Phillips 66 about Risks to Bayway Refinery and Other Coastal Refineries

The Union of Concerned Scientists sent a letter to Phillips 66 on February 25, 2015 expressing concern about the lack of public disclosure of physical risks due to climate change at Phillips 66’s coastal refineries. "As you are aware, Superstorm Sandy caused a 7,770 gallon oil spill at the Bayway refinery in 2012. The refinery was shut down for several weeks due to flood damage, and incurred significant maintenance and repair expenses," says the leter. "Risk of such events in the future is likely to grow. Diminished refining utilization rates, downtime or closure of facilities due to direct damage, danger to employees, releases of environmental contamination, disruption in supply chains and distribution centers, and/ or power supply due to storm surge or sea level rise could have a material impact on production and related cash flows."[52]

December 30, 2014: Phillips Donates $100,000 to Belle Chasse YMCA

The Plaquemines Gazette reported on December 30, 2014 that Phillips presented a $100,000 grant to the YMCA of Greater New Orleans on December 22, 2014 that will allow the YMCA in Belle Chasse to build an outdoor walking and jogging track around their facility. “Phillips 66’s Alliance Refinery recently recognized a need for a safe place, free from traffic, for walkers and joggers to exercise outside. Without even being asked to do so, they have now provided a means to our YMCA Belle Chasse facility to meet this community need. Thank you Phillips 66 for your generosity,” said YMCA of Greater New Orleans’ President and Chief Executive Officer Gordon Wadge.[53]

October 29, 2014: Phillips Increased Advantaged Crude to Alliance Refinery in Third Quarter

Greg Garland told analysts during the third quarter earnings conference call on October 29, 2014 that during the third quarter, 95% of Phillips U.S. crude slate was advantaged, and this compares with 93% last quarter and this was tied to increased advantaged crude at the Alliance Refinery. "During the quarter, 95% of our U.S. crude slate was advantaged, and this compares with 93% last quarter. This represents a record quarter for us. The improvement was tied to increased crude runs at our Alliance Refinery after their second-quarter turnaround, and was also due to certain crudes becoming advantaged relative to Brent."

"Alliance came back on after turnarounds, so you had more exposure to light and medium grades with that," added Tim Taylor. "And then there was less availability of Maya, the crude, and that was backfilled with more light medium. So we had a mix - effect that gave more exposure to light medium versus heavy in the third quarter."[54]

October 14, 2014: Bomb Scare at Alliance Refinery Was Only a PVC Pipe

The Times-Picayune reported on October 14, 2014 that a bomb scare at a Alliance Refinery on October 14, 2014 brought an FBI bomb expert to the scene, who quickly determined the suspicious object was simply a PVC pipe with putty and duct tape on the end used as a marker by a sub-contractor. The three-inch long PVC pipe, later found to contain a two-inch in diameter ball bearing, "is commonly used by a refinery subcontractor as a marker while taking X-rays," according to the Plaquemines Sheriff's Office. A sheriff's office spokesman said the refinery did not need to be evacuated and production was not affected.[55]

July 30, 2014: Turnaround Lets Phillips Run More Eagle Ford at Alliance Refinery

Greg Garland told analysts during the 2nd quarter earnings conference on July 30, 2014 that the alliance turnaround allowed Phillips to run more Eagle Ford at Alliance but it really didn’t necessarily increase overall throughput. "I don’t think it’s a function of running more lights sweet crude necessarily. We did do at alliance turnaround some work that allowed us to run more Eagle Ford at Alliance but it really didn’t necessarily increase overall throughput at alliance. It was just avoiding some of the issues we had when we ran the Eagle Ford."[56]

April 30, 2014: Earnings Down In Gulf Coast Largely Due To Plant Turnaround at Alliance Refinery

Greg Maxwell, Chief Financial Officer for Phillips, reported during the first quarter earnings call that in the Gulf Coast, earnings were down largely due to plant turnaround at the Alliance Refinery. [57]

March 26, 2014: Phillips Pays $500,000 Fine for Clean Air Violations at Alliance Refinery and Four Other Refineries

CSP Daily News reported on March 26, 2014 that Phillips will pay a $500,000 penalty for violations of the Clean Air Act at the Alliance Refinery in Belle Chasse, La., the Sweeny Refinery in Old Ocean, Texas, the Wood River Refinery in Roxana, Ill., the Lake Charles Refinery in Westlake, La., the Borger Refinery in Borger, Texas, and several terminals across the country. Phillips also agreed to retire more than 21 billion sulfur credits that could have been used in the production of gasoline, which could potentially lead to significantly less pollution from vehicles. In a administrative settlement agreement, the EPA alleged that the company generated invalid sulfur credits between 2006 and 2012 and that Phillips failed to comply with recordkeeping, reporting, sampling and testing requirements at the five refineries. EPA discovered these violations during facility inspections and through a review of company records, which included the results of third-party company audits required by the Clean Air Act.[58]

May 7, 2014: Phillips Added ‘Pre Flash’ Unit at Alliance Refinery to Improve Eagle Ford Crude Runs

Phillips added a unit during recent planned work at its Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, to improve runs of Texas Eagle Ford crude, the company’s CEO said on Wednesday. The “pre-flash” unit handles natural gas liquids and condensate that are prevalent in Eagle Ford output. Without it Alliance would have had to slow rates or shut down more often for maintenance, according to the CEO.[59]

February 14, 2014: Garland Says Phillips Has Plans to Process More Eagle Ford Crude Alliance Refinery

Greg Garland told security analysts at the Credit Suisse Global Energy Summit on February 12, 2014 that Phillips has plans to process more Eagle Ford crude at Sweeny and Alliance Refineries. "One of the things we find with the Eagle Ford crude, you hit limits because of bottleneck issues. So even in Alliance, which is 230 a day light sweet refinery, we hit limits of how much Eagle Ford we can process there. So we have projects at Alliance to debottleneck that if you will so we can process more Eagle Ford at Alliance. Similarly, Sweeny, these are projects that are $30 million or $40 million where you can take existing equipment, reconfigure, do a pre-flash tower, and we can get an incremental 5,000, 10,000 barrels a day through. But we're not going to invest $500 million or $600 million or $1 billion in adding capacity to do that. It'll be very incremental around the margin for us. So you should expect we can move to 350 to 360 and 370 maybe, but we're not going to take it to 500."[60]

February 14, 2014: Garland Says the Decision Not the Sell Alliance Refinery Was a Good One

Greg Garland told security analysts at the Credit Suisse Global Energy Summit on February 12, 2014 that the decision not to sell Alliance Refinery was a good one. "As we look at what's happening and the crudes coming at us, clearly the U.S. Gulf Coast is going to move to we think a very advantaged position. As we came out of Conoco Phillips, we made the decision to take Alliance off the market, because we were in the middle of a process to sell Alliance. I think it turned out to be a good decision for us as we look back."[61]

February 11, 2014: Alliance Refinery to Begin 47 Day Turnaround

Businessweek reported on February 11, 2014 that Alliance refinery will begin shutting down 10 units on March 5 including the only crude unit, whose atmospheric tower is plugged, and a delayed coker, which requires decoking for a turnaround that will last 47 days, according to two people who asked not to be identified because the information isn’t public. Other units to be shut for the turnaround include a catalytic reformer, a diesel hydrotreater, an aromatic extraction unit, a saturate gas unit and a low-sulfur gasoline unit, according to a regulatory filing with the state last month. The refinery’s catalytic cracker will remain in operation during the work.[62]

Dennis Nuss, a company spokesman in Houston, said in an e-mail that details regarding specific units and duration of work involved in a turnaround are considered proprietary.[63]

July 31, 2013: Phillips to Process More Light Oil at Alliance Refinery

Greg Garland told analysts at Phillips 2nd Quarters earnings conference on July 31, 2013 that Phillips has opportunities at the Sweeny Refinery, Alliance Refinery, and Lake Charles Refinery to make some modifications and process more light oil through these facilities and with minimal capital investment. "We are looking for 40% return type projects on the refining side. And so we’re looking for quick hit, fast payout projects. We have some underutilized equipment that we can kind of tie together and use that all and so we've got some projects around that that we are executing." Garland added that the projects are already underway. "We actually do things like tie-ins and turnarounds and some other things. So, it kind of depends on the schedule and things that are available, but those are our plans that we have in place to make those margin in some of our refining system already."[64]

February 14, 2013: Equipment Malfunction Shuts Compressor at Alliance Refinery

Phillips 66 reported flaring at its Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse on February 14 was due to an equipment malfunction that shut a compressor, according to a filing with the U.S. National Response Center. Operators were attempting to stabilize the units and get the compressor back online.[65]

January 30, 2013: Garland Says Phillips Has Completely Backed Out US Light Sweet Crude from Alliance Refinery

Greg Garland told analysts at the 4th quarter earnings conference on January 30, 2013 that Phillips has completely backed out imports of U.S. light sweet crude in the Gulf Coast refineries including Alliance Refinery.[66]

December 13, 2012: Phillips Announces Marine Charter Agreements to Supply Alliance Refinery with Eagle Ford Advantaged Crude

Phillips 66 reported at their inaugural Analyst Meeting on December 13, 2013 that they had recently signed time charter agreements for two medium-range Jones Act marine vessels that will supply the Alliance and Bayway refineries, and potentially the company’s other Gulf Coast refineries, with Eagle Ford crude beginning in early 2013.[67]

October 31, 2012: Phillips Ran Global Refineries at 96% Capacity in 3rd Quarter Despite Downtime at Alliance Refinery

Chief Financial Officer Greg Maxwell reported at the Phillips Third Quarter Earnings Conference on October 31, 2012 that globally Phillips ran at a 96% utilization rate despite the Alliance refinery being down for approximately three weeks related to the impact of Hurricane Isaac.[68]

September 21, 2012: Production Resumes at Alliance Refinery

Nasdaq reported on September 26, 2012 that production had resumed at its Alliance refinery on September 21, 2012 as expected. Operations were idled on August 28 ahead of Hurricane Isaac.[69]

September 19, 2012: Phillips Expects to Have Alliance Back Online by September 22

Phillips 66 reported on September 17, 2012 that several units have been brought back online at the Alliance Refinery and that Phillips expects to have all refinery units back online by the end of the week of September 17.[70]

September 6, 2012: Power Restored at Alliance Refinery

Phillips 66 reported on September 6, 2012 that power was restored to Alliance Refinery on September 5, 2012 and the refinery expected to be operating by mid-September.[71]

September 5, 2012: Alliance Refinery Loses Electricity

Phillips 66 reported on September 5, 2012 that Alliance Refinery has lost electricity supply from its third-party power provider and work is proceeding to resolve the problem, and the utility provider expects to have power back to the refinery by late in the day on September 5, 2012. This outage will slow the restart of the refinery.[72]

Greg Garland told investors and securities analysts at the 2012 Barclays CEO Energy-Power Conference in New York on September 5, 2012 that Isaac went right over the top of the Alliance refinery. "We got back in the refinery on Wednesday afternoon. Some minor damage in terms of insulation blown off of towers, but really the refinery came through in really good shape. Back side of the storm created flooding in Plaquemines Parish. It overran a levy. We had about a 100 foot breach in our dike. So we got water into the refinery. By Thursday afternoon, we had managed to breach that. But we had about a foot to a foot and a half of water in the refinery. By Saturday, we had pumped all that out. No equipment damage really. We had hardened the refinery after Katrina. We had raised and elevated motor control centers, control rooms, etc. So really no equipment damage. We got a boiler started up Sunday night. We got gas restored on Sunday, power restored on Tuesday. So we're in startup mode and we expect in six to nine days, we'll have Alliance up and running. So really we came out well compared to the Katrina event back in 2005."[73]

September 4, 2012: Electricity Restored to Alliance Refinery

Phillips 66 reported on September 4, 2012 that power was restored to the Alliance Refinery early the morning of September 24, 2012 and refinery personnel are in the process of safely bringing the refinery back online. It is expected to take a couple of weeks before the refinery is running at normal rates.[74]

September 4, 2012: Alliance Refinery Reports Leakage at Oil Storage Facility

Reuters reported on September 4, 2012 that a leaking oil storage facility at the Alliance Refinery released an unknown amount of oil into the facility and surrounding area according to a filing with national pollution regulators. The incident was discovered at 1308 (local time) on September 2, 2012, the filing said.[75]

September 2, 2012: Alliance Refinery Remains Shut Down without Power

Phillips 66 reported on September 2, 2012 that the Alliance Refinery remains shut down and is without power at this time but most of the floodwater has been cleared from the refinery and personnel have returned to work and are preparing the refinery for an eventual restart once power has been restored by the third-party power provider.[76]

August 31, 2012: Alliance Refinery Remains Shut Down Due to Flooding

Phillips 66 reported on August 31, 2012 that the Alliance Refinery remains shut down without power and floodwater remains in parts of the refinery. More than 100 employees should be at the refinery by the end of August 31, 2012 to assist with assessment and recovery of the refinery and additional emergency generators, fuel and other supplies also are expected. A timeline for restart will be developed once the assessment is complete.[77]

Herald Online reported on August 31, 2012 that Phillips will contribute $500,000 to the American Red Cross to assist relief operations following Hurricane Isaac and flooding in the Gulf Coast region and will match employee contributions for disaster relief. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to all those impacted by Hurricane Isaac, including our many employees, friends and neighbors across the Gulf Coast,” said Phillips CEO Greg Garland. “We are extremely thankful that all of the employees at our Alliance Refinery in Belle Chasse, La., and their immediate families are safe, though some have experienced significant damage to their homes and property.[78]

August 30, 2012: Some Flooding from Hurricane Isaac in Alliance Refinery

Phillips 66 reported on their web site on Augsut 30, 2012 that a team is assessing damage from flooding from Hurricane Isaac and that some flooding is evident in the refinery with personnel working to prevent more flooding and to pump water out of the flooded areas. The refinery remains shut down and is without power and a timeline for restarting the refinery will be made once the assessment is complete.[79]

August 28, 2012: Alliance Refinery Loses Power During Hurricane Isaac

The Times-Picayune reported on August 28, 2012 that according Plaquemines Parish Sheriff's Office deputies, Hurricane Isaac knocked out power at the Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery in Belle Chase's Jesuit Bend area. Belle Chase has about 5,100 outages as hurricane-force winds in lower Plaquemines likely would last between 6 to 10 hours.[80] “We are not yet able to confirm whether or not flooding in the region has impacted the refinery,” the company said in a statement on its website.[81] The Phillips 66 web site reported that refinery personnel are making plans to re-enter the refinery once the hurricane has passed and it is safe to do so in order to assess the condition of the refinery. A decision on a timeline for restart will be made once the assessment can be completed.[82]

August 27, 2012: Alliance Refinery Will be Shut Down for Hurricane Isaac

Fox News reported on August 27, 2012 that the Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse was in the process of suspending operations and would be completely shut down by the evening of August 27, 2012 ahead of Tropical Storm Isaac.[83] Refinery owners often shut down operations in advance of a storm because refineries consume enormous amounts of electric power and generate steam to cook crude oil into gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and heating oil and if a refinery loses power suddenly, operators can't properly clear the partially cooked oil out of pipes, and re-starting the refinery can take several days or even weeks. However if refineries instead conduct what is known as an orderly shutdown, they can re-start as soon as the power supply is assured again.[84]

August 26, 2012: Alliance Refinery Likely to Shut Down for Hurricane Isaac

Reuters reported on August 26, 2012 that Hurricane Isaac looks set to disrupt U.S. offshore oil and gas supplies and analysts say it could wreak havoc on "refinery row" along the Gulf Coast, a low-lying area between Texas and Mississippi that is home to about 44 percent of U.S. refining capacity and could be the biggest test for U.S. energy infrastructure since 2008, when Hurricanes Gustav and Ike disrupted offshore oil output for months and damaged onshore natural gas processing plants, pipelines and some refineries. According to Lousiana Governor Bobby Jindal, Phillips 66 was "likely" to shut its 247,000 bpd Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana.[85]

August 9, 2012: Phillips 66 Puts Project On Hold to Boost ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel output at Alliance Refinery

Bloomberg reported on August 9, 2012 that Phillips is holding off on starting a project that would boost ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel output at its Alliance refinery in Louisiana. Phillips 66 is “re-evaluating the timing of the project based on market economics,” Rich Johnson, a Houston-based company spokesman, said in an e-mailed statement. “Reviewing economics such as supply and demand forecasts for our product will be taken into consideration as part of the long-range planning cycle we use to determine what capital projects we want to invest in.” The company received a permit on July 25, 2012 to expand a diesel hydrotreater and gulfining unit, according to a filing with the state’s Department of Environmental Quality allowing the units to remove more sulfur to meet emissions regulations. The permit will expire on Jan. 25, 2014.[86]

August 1, 2012: Phillips to Run 50,000 to 90,000 bpd of Advantaged Crudes to Alliance Refinery

Phillips reported during their second-quarters earnings report on August 1, 2012 that Phillips wants to move the shale crudes from 120,000 to ultimately 450,000 to 460,000 barrels a day and has a plan to get advantaged crude into most Phillips refineries. "We are trying to get those crudes to every refinery we can," said Phillips CEO Greg Garland. "And then Alliance, we are running today Eagle Ford crude and some Bakken crude in Alliance, but ultimately [we want to run] 50,000 to 90,000 barrels a day."."[87]

August 1, 2012: Phillips Won't Sell Alliance Refinery

Reuters reported on Phillips second-quarters earnings report on August 2, 2012 that Phillips 66 said it would retain its 247,000 barrel-per-day Alliance plant in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, because it expects increased access to cut-price light sweet crude to run there.[88] "We had a lot of people go through the data room. We had a handful of offers and nothing we really regarded as approaching our whole value for the asset," said Garland. "I think in the interim year that's passed since we made that first decision that our view has changed in terms of Gulf Coast crudes particularly LLS as becoming advantaged. So we just think Alliance really has more future value than certainly -- value today than what people are willing to pay."[89]

June 5, 2012: Phillips 66 Reconsiders Sale of Alliance Refinery

Nasdaq reported on June 5, 2012 that Phillips 66 CEO Greg Garland told financial analysts during an investors conference that although Phillips 66 has been considering the sale of its Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana since December 2011, the company is now rethinking the prospect amid falling prices for Light Louisiana Sweet (LLS) crude oil and may not put the refinery up for sale after all. "Our view of that refinery has increased," said Garland. "We think LLS will become an advantaged crude." Phillips 66 and other refiners have been rearranging their geographic footprint to take advantage of a boom in US oil and natural gas production that has scrambled the refining map. Refineries with access to new, discounted oil in the U.S. midcontinent have prospered, while coastal refineries have seen profit margins decline.[90] LLS sold for about $95 a barrel Tuesday, down nearly 17% since December. The premium of about $12 LLS commands over inland-crude-oil benchmark West Texas Intermediate should fall as more WTI crude comes to the Gulf Coast via pipelines and rail cars.[91]

According to an article in the Wall Street Journal on June 7, 2012, it may be difficult for Phillips to find a buyer for the Alliance Refinery because long term US gasoline consumption is falling. "Other refineries all have assets on the chopping block, but in a world where domestic fuel sales are in long-term decline, potential buyers are in short supply," write Ben Lefebre. However lower crude prices are making the economics of refining attractive again. "There may be a gleam of hope for Gulf Coast refiner profitability," writes Lefebre. "Exports are growing and Gulf Coast crude economics are getting better. The surge in domestic crude production could bring down the cost of regional oil benchmark Light Louisiana Sweet, giving refines in the region a distinct advantage, refiners and analysts have said."[92]

May 1, 2012: Phillips 66 is Trying to Sell Alliance Refinery

Garland told Reuters on May 1, 2012 that Phillips 66 aims to double refined product exports to 200,000 bpd in the next two years, but its 247,000 bpd Alliance refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana -- which runs light-sweet crude -- is on the block. Increasing U.S. light-sweet inland shale oil output along with more infrastructure to move it to the refinery-heavy Gulf Coast means more advantaged crude prices could show up in the region in the coming years, increasing Alliance's value, Garland said. If the price isn't right for what he called "a good export platform for us," Phillips 66 will keep it, Garland said. "We wouldn't let the refinery go cheap."[93]

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Master Index of Articles about Phillips 66

The North Tower and the South Tower, part of Phillips 66's Refinery Complex in Ponca City, contain over 250,000 square feet of Class A office space that is essentially unused. Research West contains another 230,000 square feet of unused Class A office space. Photo: Hugh Pickens
Ponca: A Core Asset. Phillips CEO Greg Garland told members of the Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce on August 27, 2013 that the refinery at Ponca is a 'core asset' of Phillips 66. The refinery in Ponca City "is making very good money for us," Garland told his Bartlesville audience. Garland added that he expects gas demands in the U.S. to decline by 20 percent in the next 10 years, but that demand for refined products in South America and Africa will more than offset that decline.

by Hugh Pickens, Ponca City Oklahoma


The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of Phillips 66 that documents and explains the company's business strategy and execution of that strategy.

Major Sections of this report on Phillips 66 include:

Safety, Environment, Legal


Corporate


Strategic and Financial


Business Segments


Stock Market


Reference

Refining Business Segment


Increasing Profitability in Refining Business Segment


Detailed Look at Ponca City Refinery


Other Phillips Refineries


Other Locations

Personal tools