Phillips 66: Humber Refinery

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Phillips 66 has 15 refineries globally and 2.2 million barrels a day of capacity. "When we think about our refining business we like to think about it in four segments. One is the Mid-Continent, about 21% of our capacity is there. Margins have been very strong in this area, as you know. Our largest region is the Gulf Coast, about 33% of our capacity is there.We have large economy of scale here. We have very complex refineries on the Gulf Coast. The Western US and Pacific region is about 20%, includes our interests in the Melaka refinery.The West Coast has typically had high margins historically, but the last couple years has been challenged in part due to the economic slowdown in California." Derivative Photo: Hugh Pickens

Phillips 66 has 15 refineries globally and 2.2 million barrels a day of capacity. "When we think about our refining business we like to think about it in four segments. One is the Mid-Continent, about 21% of our capacity is there. Margins have been very strong in this area, as you know. Our largest region is the Gulf Coast, about 33% of our capacity is there.We have large economy of scale here. We have very complex refineries on the Gulf Coast. The Western US and Pacific region is about 20%, includes our interests in the Melaka refinery.The West Coast has typically had high margins historically, but the last couple years has been challenged in part due to the economic slowdown in California."[1][2][3]

Humber Refinery

Humber Refinery' The Humber Refinery is a British oil refinery in South Killingholme, North Lincolnshire. It is situated south of the railway line next to the A160; Total's Lindsey Oil Refinery is north of the railway line. It is situated approximately ten miles north west of Grimsby, and processes approximately 221,000 barrels (35,100 m3) of crude oil per day. It is owned by Phillips 66 since the split of ConocoPhillips on 1 May 2012. Photo Credit: Wikipedia David Wright Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike license 2.0

Description of Humber Refinery

The Humber Refinery is a British oil refinery in South Killingholme, North Lincolnshire. It is situated south of the railway line next to the A160; Total's Lindsey Oil Refinery is north of the railway line. It is situated approximately ten miles north west of Grimsby, and processes approximately 221,000 barrels (35,100 m3) of crude oil per day. It is owned by Phillips 66 since the split of ConocoPhillips on 1 May 2012[4]

At the time of construction Continental Oil (Conoco) owned the Jet distributor of petrol. Jet was formed in 1953 and was based nearby in Keadby in northern Lincolnshire. In June 1961 Continental Oil bought Jet Petroleum, and its 400 garages. In 1960 Continental had bought the German petrol company Sopi, and its 300 garages. The refinery was first planned in July 1964, and in August 1964 it was expected to cost £15 million, and to be operational by late 1966.[5]

Construction

Construction started in August 1966. It was built for Continental Oil (UK) Ltd, based in Ponca City, Oklahoma. It was originally estimated to cost £25 million but cost twice that. It was built by Power-Gas Corporation, a subsidiary of Sheffield-based Davy-Ashmore who had a £22 million contract. It should have been built by November 1968, and the delay in completion was blamed on bad weather in the summer of 1968, and the 1968/9 winter. Davy-Ashmore lost £12 million on the project. The railway sidings were installed by the Ward Group of Sheffield. 75 miles of steel tubing were built by the Corby steel works for £250,000. In September 1967 there were gales across the country and a man was killed on the site when an engineering shed fell on him. In October 1967 there was a strike, and 120 workers in the Constructional Engineers Union were sacked. In January 1968 a 20-year-old worker from Dublin was killed when a 275-ton coke drum, being raised by a twin jib rig onto a gantry, fell 50 feet to the ground, causing the worker to be crushed by a crane.[6]

Production

Humber Refinery opened in July 1969, producing around 80,000 barrels per day (13,000 m3/d). At the time of its opening Britain was using around 83,000 tons of petroleum coke a year, most of which was imported, and used in aluminium smelting. Much of the crude oil came from Libya, as Continental Oil had large discoveries there, and also in Dubai. The refinery had its own fire brigade. This was used on 8 August 1972 when there was a fire, with 50 feet flames, and a 49-year-old man from Grimsby was killed. In the mid-1970s there was a £45 million expansion of the plant to take its processing output to 130,000 barrels per day (21,000 m3/d). At this time, around a third of the oil it processed came from the North Sea. It was the first refinery to receive oil from British National Oil Corporation's (Britoil) Thistle field on 15 April 1978. In the mid-1990s Conoco invested £500 million in the plant.[7]

Operations

The notable areas of operation include an alkylation plant, the UK's only premium petroleum coke (for smelting steel) processing facility including three calcination rotary tunnels. 700,000 tonnes of petroleum coke are produced each year. 70% of the refined oil is for UK use, the rest is exported to mainland Europe. It is the world's largest producer of speciality graphite cokes. It is the largest anode coke producer in Europe. Crude oil arrives by tanker at Tetney in East Lindsey, then stored at the Tetney oil terminal, before being pumped underground to the refinery for refining. 130,000 barrels (21,000 m3) of petrol are produced per day, most of which is loaded onto tanker lorries at Immingham Dock. A purpose-built warehouse on the docks stores the petroleum coke before it is shipped out.[8]

News and Views at Humber Refinery

February 7, 2014: Phillips Appoints Julian Stoll as New Refinery Manager at Humber

The Grimsby Telegraph reported on February 7, 2014 that Phillips has appointed Julian Stoll as the new refinery manager at Humber Refinery replacing Brian Coffman who elected to retire after nearly two years in charge. Stoll returns to Britain from the Billings Refinery in Montana, following a step in the career path of Mike Wirkowski, Coffman's predecessor, who departed in the summer of 2012. Stoll joined Conoco in 1991 on completion of a degree in chemical and bio-process engineering at the University of Bath, as a chemical/process engineer at the Humber Refinery. Stoll subsequently worked at Humber in production, economics planning, strategy and business development. Stoll is the first Brit to head up Humber since John Thornton, also originally a junior engineer there, departed in 2008. Stoll's appointment, the fifth change in little over a decade, comes during a period of flux for the wider chemicals sector.[9]

November 28, 2013: Two Workers Injured in Steam Leak at Humber Refinery

The Grimsby Telegraph reported on November 28, 2013 that two workmen from Phillips, who received serious injuries after a steam leak at the Killingholme refinery last week, are still being treated at Pinderfields Hospital in Wakefield with one worker in a critical condition while the second is said to be making satisfactory progress.[10] The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has visited the site and an official investigation into the accident is underway.[11]

September 30, 2013: Contractors at Humber Refinery Protest Against Cuts to Breaks

The Grimsby Telegraph reported on September 30, 2013 that more than 100 contractors at the Humber Refinery in Killingholme held on early morning protest on their own time outside the gates of the refinery to protest Phillips' plan to cut the 20 minute mid-morning refreshment break that goes into force January 1. "Everyone knows the importance of a break, especially in this kind of workplace." said one contractor who declined to be identified. "We need the tea break to refresh, to cool off and rehydrate."[12] The Grimsby Telegraph reported on October 1, 2013 that over 100 contractors met with union representatives and held a indicative vote through a show of hands to bring about the process of a legal vote for strike action over Phillips' plan to remove their 20 minute morning break starting January 2014. "When we are up there working in the freezing cold we need that tea break to warm up, when we are out there in the blistering heat we need that tea break to cool down," said an unidentified contrator. "They tell us safety first and tell us to follow guidelines but taking this break away means we are not following safety guidelines. When they are sat in ivory towers they can have their tea breaks still."[13]

Phillips 66 Worldwide Refineries

Phillips has the following worldwide refineries:[14]

Country Name Location Capacity (KBD) Nelson Complexity Factor Clean Product Yield
Gulf Coast US Alliance Refinery (AL) Belle Chasse, LA 247 12.5 86%
Eastern US and Europe Bayway Refinery (BW) Linden, NJ 238 8.4 90%
Central US Billings Refinery (BI) Billings, MT 118 14.4 89%
Central US Borger Refinery (BG) Borger, TX 146 12.3 89%
Western US and Asia Ferndale Refinery (FN) Ferndale, WA 105 7.0 75%
Eastern US and Europe Humber Refinery (HU) North Linconshire 265 11.6 81%
Gulf Coast US Lake Charles Refinery (LC) Westlake, LA 239 11.2 69%
Western US and Asia Los Angeles Refinery (LA) Carson, CA/Wilmington, CA 139 14.1 87%
Western US and Asia Melaka Refinery in Malaysia (ME) Melaka 58 9.3 83%
Eastern US and Europe MIRO Refinery in Germany* (MI) Karlsruhe 56 7.9 85%
Central US Ponca City Refinery (PC) Ponca City, OK 187 9.8 91%
Western US and Asia San Francisco Refinery (SF) Rodeo, CA and Santa Maria, CA 120 13.5 83%
Gulf Coast US Sweeny Refinery (SW) Old Ocean, TX 247 13.2 87%
Eastern US and Europe Whitegate Refinery in Ireland (WG) Cork 71 3.8 65%
Central US Wood River Refinery (WR) Roxana, IL 306 12.5 85%
  • Denotes joint ventures. Crude capacity reflects that proportion.

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References

About the Author

Hugh Pickens

Hugh Pickens (Po-Hi '67) is a physicist who has explored for oil in the Amazon jungle, crossed the empty quarter of Saudi Arabia, and built satellite control stations for Goddard Space Flight Center all over the world. Retired in 1999, Pickens and his wife moved from Baltimore back to his hometown of Ponca City, Oklahoma in 2005 where he cultivates his square foot garden, mows nine acres of lawn, writes about local history and photographs events at the Poncan Theatre and Ponca Playhouse.

Since 2001 Pickens has edited and published “Peace Corps Online,” serving over one million monthly pageviews. His other writing includes contributing over 1,500 stories to “Slashdot: News for Nerds,” and articles for Wikipedia, “Ponca City, We Love You”, and Peace Corps Worldwide.

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