Peace Corps Peru: 2003

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The Peace Corps first opened a program in Peru in 1962. Volunteers worked in grassroots development projects targeting health, agriculture, education and business development. The program in Peru supported over 2,600 Volunteers from 1962 until Peace Corps' departure in 1975. On December 12, 2001, Peru's then-president, Alejandro Toledo, officially invited the Peace Corps to return to Peru . Peace Corps Volunteers now serve in Peru by providing support to communities in four primary areas: small business development, community health promotion, environmental awareness, and youth outreach. Currently, about 170 Volunteers serve in Peru.

Sharing borders with Ecuador, Colombia, Brazil, Bolivia, and Chile, Peru is a large and diverse country. Its unique environmental variations include the arid coastal desert, the Andean Mountains and valleys, and the Amazonian tropical forests. With so many ecosystems and climatic zones, Peru is a country rich in biodiversity, with many rare species of flora and fauna. The country is home to approximately 25 million people of various cultures. The Peace Corps first opened a program in Peru in 1962. Volunteers worked in grassroots development projects targeting health, agriculture, education and business development. The program in Peru supported over 2,600 Volunteers from 1962 until Peace Corps' departure in 1975. On December 12, 2001, Peru's then-president, Alejandro Toledo, officially invited the Peace Corps to return to Peru . Peace Corps Volunteers now serve in Peru by providing support to communities in four primary areas: small business development, community health promotion, environmental awareness, and youth outreach. Currently, about 170 Volunteers serve in Peru.[1]

Contents

2003

2003: Film Maker served in Peace Corps in Peru and later traveled to Tunisia

St. Clair Bourne was born in Harlem on February 16, 1943 and was raised and educated in New York City. He entered Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. after graduating from Xavier High School in New York and was aiming for a career in the Foreign Service Diplomatic Corps. But the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s got in the way when he was arrested during a sit-in in Arlington, Virginia in his junior year and left school. Suddenly adrift, he joined the Peace Corps and served as a Volunteer in Peru for two years, helping to publish a local newspaper that became a national award-winning journal during his tenure. Word of the activist reached EBONY magazine, resulting in a ten-page spread on Bourne and he became something of a Peace Corps celebrity. When his two-year term ended, Bourne entered Syracuse University on a work-study scholarship program, earning a dual degree in journalism and political science while teaching Peace Corps trainees. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Chamba. "St. Clair Bourne Was Born In Harlem On February 16, 1943 And Was Raised And Educated In New York City. He Entered Georgetown University In Washington, D.c. After Graduating From Xavier High School In New York And Was Aiming For A Career In The Foreign Service Diplomatic Corps. But The Civil Rights Movement Of The 1960s Got In The Way When He Was Arrested During A Sit-In In Arlington, Virginia In His Junior Year And Left School." January 28, 2003.


2003: Film Maker St. Clair Bourne served in Peace Corps in Peru and later traveled to Tunisia

Suddenly adrift, he joined the Peace Corps and served as a Volunteer in Peru for two years, helping to publish a local newspaper that became a national award-winning journal during his tenure. Word of the activist reached EBONY magazine, resulting in a ten-page spread on Bourne and he became something of a Peace Corps celebrity. When his two-year term ended, Bourne entered Syracuse University on a work-study scholarship program, earning a dual degree in journalism and political science while teaching Peace Corps trainees. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Chamba. "Film Maker St. Clair Bourne Served In Peace Corps In Peru And Later Traveled To Tunisia" January 28, 2003.


2003: Peace Corps Resumes Work in Peru

The Peace Corps resumed work in Peru on Monday, nearly three decades after a leftist military government ended the American volunteer program in Peru. The current batch of 28 volunteers will work on small business development and community health projects in coastal and mountain regions across Peru, a nation about the size of Alaska. The corps first sent volunteers to the South American nation in 1962. But the government ordered the volunteers to leave in 1975, saying that such development work could be better done by Peruvians. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Miami Herald. "Peace Corps Resumes Work In Peru" February 3, 2003.


2003: Peace Corps Swears-In Volunteers in Peru

The first full group of Peace Corps volunteers to serve in Peru since 1975 was sworn-in on Monday, February 3, 2003. Peruvian President Alejandro Toledo, along with U.S. Ambassador John Dawson, swore-in the 27 Volunteers during a ceremony in Santa Eulalia, Peru. President Toledo invited the Peace Corps to return to Peru in 2001 after a 27-year absence and signed an agreement with the Peace Corps on March 23, 2002. The first contingent of Peace Corps staff and four transferred volunteers arrived in Peru to restart programs in August 2002. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Peace Corps Press Release. "Peace Corps Swears-In Volunteers In Peru" February 7, 2003.


2003: University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee. Peace Corps Training Center

Project records typically contain a bibliography of materials for trainees; bulletins of general information for trainees; correspondence from various project and training directors to university staff and volunteers regarding training, functions and progress of programs; instructions for trainees; news releases; a project reports; training program rosters; program syllabi and schedules of events; and information on volunteer support, graduation, medical concerns, technical training, and travel. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: University of Wisconsin. "Archives: Finding Aid" February 9, 2003.


2003: The Toughest Job

On the outside, the men's prison in Arequipa, Peru--where I worked from 1964 to 1966--looked like an old fortified castle. On the inside, it was a cold, foreboding barn-like place. It wasn't cruel or sadistic; it was ruled, instead, by benign neglect. The vast majority of the prisoners were young men of Quechua origin, that is, they were Indians who spoke little or no Spanish. Most were from the high mountain towns of the Andes who had come down to the 7,000-foot-high city of Arequipa seeking work. Most were in jail for minor crimes such as petty theft, and many had common-law wives and children. The job I created for myself was to try to find work for the women so they could feed their kids while the fathers were serving their sentences. It was also my job to work with the legal system to try to speed up the trials. But justice was slow and enforcement was lax. These young guys had no money and didn't speak Spanish, so they were at the bottom of the judicial heap. Their trials were delayed because they knew no one of importance and couldn't pay to move their cases forward. By the time I left Peru, I had convinced two young women from the local university who were studying social work to take my position--a first for middle-class Peruvian women. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Tuscon Weekly. "The Toughest Job" February 27, 2003.


2003: Peru RPCVs Dominick and Julie Maglio celebrate 20 years of their Montessori-type school

Maglio said the school's major accomplishment has been "turning out some incredibly bright, self-motivated students over 20 years." Today, Wider Horizons remains the only private non-sectarian school in the county. "We do not have any public money or any religious community to help us financially," Maglio said. "It's quality education on a shoestring," Wider Horizons calls itself a college preparatory school with a Montessori tradition. The first six grades are taught using Montessori materials and methods that encourage independent learning by individual students. The curriculum also is individualized, Maglio said. The school plans international field trips each year for students 14 years old and older. Last year, the Maglios returned to Peru with their students for 10 days. After their stint in the Peace Corps in the late 1960s, the Maglios returned to the U.S. where he taught developmental psychology at Marywood College, at Penn State University, and worked in the Eckerd youth camp. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Hernando Today. "Wider Horizon Celebrating Its 20th Anniversary Friday" March 11, 2003.


2003: The Western Massachusetts Refvolutionary Anti-Imperialist League (RAIL) says Peace Corps propaganda doesn't tell you why they left Bolivia in 1971 or Peru in 1974

Peace Corps propaganda doesn't tell you why they left Bolivia in 1971 or Peru in 1974. The truth is that "the Bolivian government expelled the Peace Corps for its alleged activities in sterilizing peasant women without their knowledge. The Peruvian government expelled the Peace Corps for similar reasons in 1974." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Western Massachusetts Refvolutionary Anti-Imperialist League (RAIL). "Peace Corps Is A Tool Of U.s. Imperialism" April 5, 2003.


2003: Peru RPCV Marlis Rufener designs houses that create less waste and give people a sense of community

When home designer Marlis Rufener lived in Peru while working for the Peace Corps, she didn't have running water, a refrigerator or a stove. The bathroom was a hole dug in the ground. Her dwelling was enclosed by a dirt wall with glass shards on top, and she had to drop a rope and bucket into a well to get water. The experience, combined with her other travels in Europe, Mexico and Independent Samoa, taught her how to make do in small spaces, cut down on waste and promote community -- knowledge she eventually applied to her home design skills. "I look at the very large houses being built today and despair about many trends they encourage: waste of materials, extra time and money necessary to clean and spend on maintenance, tying the owners to the house," Rufener said. "This can encourage an almost anti- social tendency to 'hole-up' in the house, rather than to become an active part of the community and neighborhood. Within the house, it also increases the distance between family members, allowing them to avoid one another when desired." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The Columbian. "Pushing The Efficiency Envelope: Home Designer Makes The Most Of Every Square Foot To Make Houses 'Fit' With Owners, Create Less Waste And Give People A Sense Of Community" April 6, 2003.


2003: Obituary for Peru RPCV Jon Davies

Ms. Davies, a Washington area resident since 1978, was born in Alliance, Ohio, and raised in Franklin, Pa. She graduated from Penn State University with a degree in general science and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Peru from 1968 to 1970. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Washington Post. "Jon Davies Language Analyst" May 2, 2003.


2003: Peru RPCV Javier Garza to be Dominican Republic Country Director

Javier Garza, president and CEO of Meals on Wheels and More, has resigned to become an executive with the Peace Corps, the Austin nonprofit group announced Tuesday. He will become country director for the Peace Corps in the Dominican Republic this summer. Early in his career, he was a Peace Corps volunteer in Peru and has wanted to return to the service as an overseas executive, according to the organization. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Austin Business Journal. "Meals On Wheels Ceo Quits" May 6, 2003.


2003: About Peace Corps

On December 12, 2001, Peru's president, Alejandro Toledo, officially invited the Peace Corps to return to Peru. Peace Corps Volunteers will now serve in Peru by providing critical support to communities in two primary sectors: small business and health. In 2003, 32 Peace Corps Volunteers and Volunteer Trainees will serve in Peru. The Peace Corps first opened a program in Peru in 1962. Volunteers worked in grassroots development projects targeting health, agriculture, education and business development. The program in Peru supported over 2,600 Volunteers from 1962 until Peace Corps' departure in 1975. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: US Embassy in Peru. "On December 12, 2001, Peru's President, Alejandro Toledo, Officially Invited The Peace Corps To Return To Peru. Peace Corps Volunteers Will Now Serve In Peru By Providing Critical Support To Communities In Two Primary Sectors: Small Business And Health. In 2003, 32 Peace Corps Volunteers And Volunteer Trainees Will Serve In Peru." May 18, 2003.


2003: RPCV Leon Haller writes: I just thought of myself as being part of an adventure as a member of the first Peace Corps group that went to Peru

Many years ago, I found myself part of the alianza para el progresso at the beginning of the Kennedy administration. I just thought of myself as being part of an adventure as a member of the first Peace Corps group that went to Peru. I wanted to live in and learn about another culture. Oh, yes, I also wanted to escape the draft and the potential of becoming cannon fodder in Vietnam. These were the early days of the Peace Corps, when it was experimental for the administration as well as the volunteers. We helped build the training camp in Puerto Rico, and our arrival in Peru was delayed many months because of an overthrow of a newly elected government by four generals, one of whom I subsequently met. He tried to eliminate the other three. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Tuscon Weekly. "The Nation Could Learn A Lesson From The Corps" May 18, 2003.


2003: Former Peace Corps Volunteers and Staff Participate in Iraqi Humanitarian Efforts

Michigan State President, Peter McPherson, was appointed to lead a team to revitalize the Iraqi economy. McPherson worked as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Peru during the mid-1960s. McPherson will work with the Ministry of Finance, and the central bank and nationwide banking network in Iraq. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Peace Corps Press Release. "Former Peace Corps Volunteers And Staff Participate In Iraqi Humanitarian Efforts" May 19, 2003.


2003: Amanda Alexander finds that Peace Corps service in Peru is a learning experience

So after a long process of about one year, I arrived in Lima, Peru, to do two years of Peace Corps service. Originally from the small town of Silver Lake in Kosciusko County, I didn't think the Peace Corps would be hard for me. I figured, "Hey, I grew up in the campo ... dirt, bugs, no electricity, or running water won't bother me." Ha! I was wrong. Anyone who has been in my situation knows that it is hard no matter how or where you were brought up. That brings me to my job here in Cajamarca, Peru. First, I received three months of training near Lima, where the volunteers studied the culture of Peru, languages, basic needs of the people and technical skills to help along the way. Since the Peace Corps was just asked back to Peru by President Alejandro Toledo after a 30-year absence, the Peace Corps staff was very thorough. After the interviews and all of the classes, they decided where each and every one of us (27 in total) would be placed in the country. For me, that was Cajamarca. Mainly my placement in Cajamarca was because of my background in art. I was a business major in college, but minored in the arts and graphic design. Here in Cajamarca there are a lot of artisans. My job is to help these artisans increase sales, look for new markets, help them learn advertising/computer skills, or whatever they might need to help improve their quality of life. Since I have been here, I have been amazed with the artisans. They make the most beautiful ceramics and textile weavings that I have ever seen, and they do it all with unsophisticated techniques. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: South Bend Tribune. "Peace Corps Job Is Learning Experience" June 4, 2003.


2003: Peru RPCV Diane Phillips dies of cancer

Mrs. Phillips She graduated from Los Altos High School in 1960 and from Stanford University in 1964. At Stanford, she met Julian Phillips. They were married in 1964 and headed to Peru with the Peace Corps, where they served for two years. Their daughter Lindsay was born in 1968, their son Jeff in 1971. The family moved to San Mateo in 1978. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The San Alros Town Crier. "Diane Phillips, 60, Foothills Minister And Lahs Graduate, Dies Of Cancer" June 18, 2003.


2003: Peru RPCV John McAuliff, Executive Director of the Fund for Reconciliation and Development, hosts reception for Her Excellency Mme. SUN Saphoeun, Under Secretary of State, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Kingdom of Cambodia

"At the outset, I wish to take this opportunity to thank the Fund for Reconciliation and Development (FRD), in particular Mr. John McAuliff, for organizing this regular meeting as well as for inviting the Cambodian delegation to take part in this important event. Every year, on the sideline of the UN General Assembly meeting, the Fund for Reconciliation has been constantly organizing this particular forum as an important venue for exchanging views and updating information on the latest development in countries, such as the Kingdom of Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Kingdom of Cambodia. "Speech By Her Excellency Mme. Sun Saphoeun, Under Secretary Of State, Ministry Of Foreign Affairs And International Cooperation, Kingdom Of Cambodia" September 20, 2003.


2003: Another Review of Portland's Andian Restaurant run by son of Peru RPCV John Platt

Peru is no more a single culinary region than the United States, where a world of difference rests between a Louisiana gumbo and a Boston baked bean. Geographically and culinarily, Peru breaks roughly into three parts: the coast, with its wealth of seafoods and its cosmopolitan capital of Lima; the Andean highlands, with their rustic flavors and deep cultural history; and the far eastern jungles of the upper Amazon watershed, with their rich tropical fruits (don't miss Andina's ethereal mango mousse). Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Oregon Live. "Andean High" September 26, 2003.


2003: "The Peace Corps Never Warned Me what I was Really in For"

It's another blistering hot afternoon in Tabanco, a shantytown of about 400 people in northern Peru's Sechura desert. Heather Frankland, a soft-spoken, blue-eyed 24-year-old, walks along a stretch of the Pan-American Highway dressed in a blue cardigan and matching tank top over loose woven pants and sandals. She is part of Peru One, a group of 26 PCVs (19 are female) who are the first here since Peru's military government axed the program in 1975 during and anti-U.S. backlash. Her job, technically, is to teach Tabanco's residents about health, like the importance of hand-washing and boiling water. Her secondary project is teaching English to the local children a few day as week. Heather also spends much of her time going up and down the highway, stopping to socialize in people's homes. Eighteen-wheelers and buses roar past while passersby shout warm greetings to her, wave or honk their horns. Everybody in town knows who she is. "Being the first group, we're more here to establish and meet people," she explains, noting that because Heather is difficult for many of the Peruvians to pronounce, she goes by Flor. "It's better that gringa," she says, smirking. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Jane Magazine. ""The Peace Corps Never Warned Me What I Was Really In For" October 9, 2003.


2003: Son of Peru RPCV John Platt open Peruvian Restaurant in Portland Oregon

Platt's father, John, is an Oregon native who moved to northern Peru during the Vietnam War. He served in the Peace Corps in the ancient city of Cajamarca. A Harvard graduate, John taught college physics and, on the side, taught English in the community. This is how he met Doris Rodriguez, the daughter of a local attorney who wanted his family to learn English. Doris and John began dating after the war, when John, who had remained in -- and grown to love -- Peru, took a job as the physics coordinator for the government's educational system. (As fate would have it, Doris was working in the chemistry coordinator's office.) Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Oregon Live. "Andina Welcomes With The Warmth Of Peru" November 16, 2003.


2003: Andina Restaurant opened by Peru RPCV John Platt and family in Portland

Since her childhood in the Northern Andean town of Cajamarca, Doris Platt Rodriguez was exposed to the traditions of the country kitchen that celebrated the native ingredients of Peru. She remembers in particular the many varieties of potato, corn, peppers and sub-tropical fruits (like cherimoya, lucuma and mango), which were included together with local cheeses and meats at her daily family feasts. The dining table was the center and heart of family gatherings, storytelling and the school of manners through which she learned the values and customs of her culture. She recalls the graciousness of her mother and the humor of her father, and observes in anecdote that it was her grandmother who occupied the honored seat at the table and was always served first. And as a gesture to unannounced guests as well as the needy outside their door, her mother would always leave a little extra food in the pot, just in case. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Andina Restaurant. "Our Inspiration Behind Opening Andina Was A Vision Our Entire Family Shared. We Have Always Been Proud Of Our Mixed Heritage And Have Been Challenged To Find Ways In Which To Best Reconcile Our Love Of Peru With The Land We Have Chosen To Live In." November 18, 2003.


2003: Award-winning composer Gabriela Lena Frank is daughter of Peace Corps volunteer

Gabriela Lena Frank, an American-born woman of Peruvian, Jewish, and Chinese ancestry, grew up listening to Andean music. Creating her piano solo of "Sonata Andina" involved "taking Andean music and translating it to Western instruments," she said. In the second movement, for example, Ms. Frank imitated four-note chords she heard four men in Peru playing on panpipes. Later, during the fourth movement, her music imitates two kinds of native guitars, panpipes and the marimba (xylophone). G-major chords dominate in the "Sonata Andina" because, Ms. Frank explained, they were the first notes she heard. She is partially deaf and only began using a hearing aid when she was five years old. Ms. Frank's hearing impairment has resulted in barefoot performances because it allows her to feel the music. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: New York News Network. "Audience Explores Young Composers' Music" December 8, 2003.


References

  1. Peace Corps Web Site. "Peru" 2008.
  2. Chamba. "St. Clair Bourne Was Born In Harlem On February 16, 1943 And Was Raised And Educated In New York City. He Entered Georgetown University In Washington, D.c. After Graduating From Xavier High School In New York And Was Aiming For A Career In The Foreign Service Diplomatic Corps. But The Civil Rights Movement Of The 1960s Got In The Way When He Was Arrested During A Sit-In In Arlington, Virginia In His Junior Year And Left School." January 28, 2003.
  3. Chamba. "Film Maker St. Clair Bourne Served In Peace Corps In Peru And Later Traveled To Tunisia" January 28, 2003.
  4. Miami Herald. "Peace Corps Resumes Work In Peru" February 3, 2003.
  5. Peace Corps Press Release. "Peace Corps Swears-In Volunteers In Peru" February 7, 2003.
  6. University of Wisconsin. "Archives: Finding Aid" February 9, 2003.
  7. Tuscon Weekly. "The Toughest Job" February 27, 2003.
  8. Hernando Today. "Wider Horizon Celebrating Its 20th Anniversary Friday" March 11, 2003.
  9. Western Massachusetts Refvolutionary Anti-Imperialist League (RAIL). "Peace Corps Is A Tool Of U.s. Imperialism" April 5, 2003.
  10. The Columbian. "Pushing The Efficiency Envelope: Home Designer Makes The Most Of Every Square Foot To Make Houses 'Fit' With Owners, Create Less Waste And Give People A Sense Of Community" April 6, 2003.
  11. Washington Post. "Jon Davies Language Analyst" May 2, 2003.
  12. Austin Business Journal. "Meals On Wheels Ceo Quits" May 6, 2003.
  13. US Embassy in Peru. "On December 12, 2001, Peru's President, Alejandro Toledo, Officially Invited The Peace Corps To Return To Peru. Peace Corps Volunteers Will Now Serve In Peru By Providing Critical Support To Communities In Two Primary Sectors: Small Business And Health. In 2003, 32 Peace Corps Volunteers And Volunteer Trainees Will Serve In Peru." May 18, 2003.
  14. Tuscon Weekly. "The Nation Could Learn A Lesson From The Corps" May 18, 2003.
  15. Peace Corps Press Release. "Former Peace Corps Volunteers And Staff Participate In Iraqi Humanitarian Efforts" May 19, 2003.
  16. South Bend Tribune. "Peace Corps Job Is Learning Experience" June 4, 2003.
  17. The San Alros Town Crier. "Diane Phillips, 60, Foothills Minister And Lahs Graduate, Dies Of Cancer" June 18, 2003.
  18. Kingdom of Cambodia. "Speech By Her Excellency Mme. Sun Saphoeun, Under Secretary Of State, Ministry Of Foreign Affairs And International Cooperation, Kingdom Of Cambodia" September 20, 2003.
  19. Oregon Live. "Andean High" September 26, 2003.
  20. Jane Magazine. ""The Peace Corps Never Warned Me What I Was Really In For" October 9, 2003.
  21. Oregon Live. "Andina Welcomes With The Warmth Of Peru" November 16, 2003.
  22. Andina Restaurant. "Our Inspiration Behind Opening Andina Was A Vision Our Entire Family Shared. We Have Always Been Proud Of Our Mixed Heritage And Have Been Challenged To Find Ways In Which To Best Reconcile Our Love Of Peru With The Land We Have Chosen To Live In." November 18, 2003.
  23. New York News Network. "Audience Explores Young Composers' Music" December 8, 2003.
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