Peace Corps Afghanistan: 2007

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Peace Corps was active in Afghanistan from 1962 to 1976. Although President Bush proposed returning the Peace Corps to the country in 2002, the security situation in the country has not allowed a return to Afghanistan but the legacy of the Peace Corps' fourteen years in Afghanistan lives on in the many RPCVs who lives were deeply affected by their work in the country and in the many RPCVs who served in other countries but who now work in Afghanistan in civil affairs, diplomacy, as aid workers in NGO's and as journalists. RPCVs with an Afghan connection include Thomas Gouttierre who became Director of the Center of Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in 1974; Sarah Chayes (RPCV Morocco) who since 2002 has been responsible for rebuilding homes and schools, creating employment for about 300 people and launching today's most popular local radio station in Kandahar; James Rupert (RPCV Morocco) who has reported on on Afghanistan since the 1980's for Newsday, Bloomberg, and the Washington Post; and Ben Rosen (RPCV Iran) who since 1995 has worked with Teacher's College to produce textbooks, design curriculum, recruit teachers and help local ministries take over these tasks and who returned to Afghanistan in 2003 to help reopen the college.

Peace Corps was active in Afghanistan from 1962 to 1976. Although President Bush proposed returning the Peace Corps to the country in 2002, the security situation in the country has not allowed a return to Afghanistan but the legacy of the Peace Corps' fourteen years in Afghanistan lives on in the many RPCVs who lives were deeply affected by their work in the country and in the many RPCVs who served in other countries but who now work in Afghanistan in civil affairs, diplomacy, as aid workers in NGO's and as journalists. RPCVs with an Afghan connection include Thomas Gouttierre who became Director of the Center of Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in 1974; Sarah Chayes (RPCV Morocco) who since 2002 has been responsible for rebuilding homes and schools, creating employment for about 300 people and launching today's most popular local radio station in Kandahar; James Rupert (RPCV Morocco) who has reported on on Afghanistan since the 1980's for Newsday, Bloomberg, and the Washington Post; and Ben Rosen (RPCV Iran) who since 1995 has worked with Teacher's College to produce textbooks, design curriculum, recruit teachers and help local ministries take over these tasks and who returned to Afghanistan in 2003 to help reopen the college.


Contents

2007

2007: Mauritania RPCV Jiffer Bourguignon writes: Afghan winter cold, but not like home

In Afghanistan, it is said that the winter is the calmest time of the year because "it's just too cold to fight." After the cold Green Bay has felt in the last week and the many weeks of subzero temperatures I have felt in Kabul, I think we can both see the logic in that. The water pipes in many homes here are frozen solid, as are the wells, and the remains of a snowstorm that hit town three weeks ago still blanket the city. The heat from the boukhari, the wood-burning stove that warms my office — - as well as roasts almonds and makes a mean espresso — begins to wane and I hike my shawl up around my shoulders, just as an Afghan colleague walks by in flip-flop sandals and no socks, a brash contrast to my Green Bay sensitivities. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Green Bay Press-Gazette. "Guest Column: Afghan Winter Cold, But Not Like Home" February 10, 2007.


2007: Dr. Mary Frantz and her husband, Dr. John Frantz joined the Peace Corps in 1968 and were stationed in Afghanistan, where they taught medicine

After 61 years of marriage, it's no wonder the couple are able to finish each other's sentences and still find laughs in each others slip-ups. And after 61 years of marriage, it's no wonder the couple are still abiding by their own advice: hang in there. The Frantzes share many interests. They met in medical school at the University of Rochester in New York. They had five children. They have traveled all over the world. The Frantzes, at the urging of their children, who were then ages 8 to 14, joined the Peace Corps in 1968. They were stationed in Afghanistan, where they taught medicine. All five of their girls joined them. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The Monroe Times. "Hanging In There" March 24, 2007.


2007: As a female journalist in Afghanistan, Sarah Chayes embraced the culture - including dressing as an Afghan man - to win a host of powerful friends

From her experience in the Peace Corps, she'd learned to integrate with the locals, so when she ended up in Kandahar, she went to live with an Afghan family. "There were 22 of us in there, counting a dozen kids, not counting the cow and her calf and two oversized brown Turkish sheep," she writes. "We had no running water, but we did have our own well and reliable electricity. I spent the nights with my driver and my youngest host-brother, in the public part of the compound." The big advantage of her strategy was that she soon became accepted, enjoying privileges denied to other foreigners. She learned the Afghans' way of life - their tribal laws and their mendacity - and watched with growing disbelief as the invasion was mishandled. "Basically, I took what our governments said on face value," says Sarah. "There were two stated agendas. The first was the democracy, the nation-building thing, that we're going to help Afghan institutions into a healthy democracy. The other one was that we were going to hunt down al Qaida, but that was in contradiction with the first agenda because the way we did it was like cowboys." Morocco RPCV Sarah Chayes has made a home in Kandahar, Afghanistan, became fluent in Pashto, one of the main Afghan languages, and devoted her energies to rebuilding a country gutted by two decades of war Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The Northern Echo. "Into The Soul Of Afghanistan" April 13, 2007.


2007: Hugh Thomson reviews The Punishment Of Virtue, by Sarah Chayes

Sarah Chayes's account is a welcome antidote to such tales of derring-do. An American journalist, she stayed on in Afghanistan to help rebuild the country after the allied invasion and has witnessed the lack of any clear US policy - and has spotted the reasons. She notices that staff are rotated after a few months on a "hardship station", with a resulting lack of continuity or purpose. The military have no good Pashtu translators, or even a clear sense of the clan divisions in a country where tribal loyalty is so important. The result? "The sails are always luffing," and America remains irresolute in the face of the warlords it relies on, and of the self-fulfilling presumption that the country is inherently ungovernable. Chayes' message is that the allies face an extraordinarily resolute enemy in the Taliban and need to be equally clear-sighted. Far from being ungovernable, the Afghans have a long tradition of local democracy; it should be built on, rather than relying on the thugs and warlords who killed her friend. This passionate and engaged dispatch from the field is in the best tradition of grassroots reporting; it is, quite simply, the best book on Afghanistan since the invasion. Morocco RPCV Sarah Chayes has made a home in Kandahar, Afghanistan, became fluent in Pashto, one of the main Afghan languages, and devoted her energies to rebuilding a country gutted by two decades of war Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The Independent. "The Punishment Of Virtue, By Sarah Chayes" April 24, 2007.


2007: James Rupert writes: U.S.-led forces kill Taliban field commander Mullah Dadullah

He was an inspirational and daring commander," said Rahi- mullah Yusufzai, a Pakistani journalist who specializes on the politics of the ethnic Pashtun regions of Pakistan and Afghanistan where the Taliban are based. "I don't see any person of his standing in the Taliban hierarchy," he told Reuters news agency. "It is clear that for now, at least, that there is no one who can replace him," Yusufzai said. Dadullah was attacked by troops of a relatively small, U.S.-commanded force in Afghanistan, supported by Afghan government troops and by the International Security Assistance Force, which is commanded by NATO, an ISAF statement said. The U.S.-commanded troops include special operations forces, and have been in Helmand in recent weeks but neither the ISAF nor the U.S. command released details about the raid during the weekend. Journalist James Rupert, head of Newsday's international bureau in Islamabad, Pakistan began his career abroad as a Peace Corps volunteer, teaching mechanics and welding in Morocco. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Newsday. "U.s.-Led Forces Kill Taliban Field Commander" May 14, 2007.


2007: Thailand RPCV Leslie Wilson works as the head of Save the Children USA's mission in Afghanistan

The Afghanistan mission of Save the Children focuses largely on health and education issues. Afghanistan's maternal mortality rate is one of the worst in the world, and children's education has been hurt by years of Taliban rule and war. Ms. Wilson is cautiously optimistic about the organization's progress. "Despite all the political chaos, the military chaos," she said, "on the social front, on the health care front, there are good things happening." Save the Children's strategy has been to try projects on a local level that, if successful, can then be applied on a larger scale. One recent project worked with community health workers who were largely illiterate. Ms. Wilson said that the illiterate workers learned over the course of 18 months how to educate communities about drugs to prevent post-partum hemorrhages in mothers, one of the most common ways women die in Afghanistan. Ms. Wilson said the drugs and the program have been very successful and will be expanded to an entire province. She hopes it can become a tool for all Afghanistan. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Pittsburgh Post Gazette. "Beaver Native Lifts Children's Hopes In Kabul" June 10, 2007.


2007: Sarah Chayes writes: NATO didn't lose Afghanistan

"In 2003, NATO moved peacekeeping forces into Kabul and parts of northern Afghanistan. But not until 2005, when it was clear that the United States was bogged down in Iraq and lacked sufficient resources to fight on two fronts, did Washington belatedly turn to NATO to take the Afghan south off its hands. And then it misrepresented the situation its allies would find there. NATO was told, in effect, that it would simply need to maintain the order the United States had established and to help with reconstruction and security. In fact, as was clear from the ground, the situation had been deteriorating since late 2002. By 2004, resurgent Taliban were making a concerted push to enter the country from Pakistan, and intensive combat between American forces and Taliban fighters was taking place north of Kandahar." Morocco RPCV Sarah Chayes has made a home in Kandahar, Afghanistan, became fluent in Pashto, one of the main Afghan languages, and devoted her energies to rebuilding a country gutted by two decades of war Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: International Herald Tribune. "Nato Didn't Lose Afghanistan" July 10, 2007.


2007: Afghanistan RPCV Dr. Jon Summers is New Country Representative in Pakistan for the Asia Foundation

Dr. Summers brings extraordinary experience and background to the Foundation's efforts in Pakistan. His extensive experience in South Asia has fostered a deep understanding of development issues and dynamics facing the region, making him highly suited to lead the Foundation's efforts there at this critical time. Since 2002, Summers has been the Foundation's Afghanistan Country Representative, where he oversaw significant program growth during an important period in Afghanistan's history. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Earth Times. "The Asia Foundation Names Dr. Jon Summers As New Country Representative In Pakistan" August 2, 2007.


2007: Afghanistan RPCV Richard Johnson collects textiles from around the world

One of the items in Johnson’s collection is a wedding dress from the Sindh in Pakistan. It is fashioned of ochre, blue, magenta and purple cloth, nearly every square inch of fabric covered and made heavy with mirror embroidery, metallic threads and silver sequins. "I was told the mother begins making the wedding dress the day her daughter is born," Johnson said. The wedding dress and more than 50 other items from Johnson’s collection will be on display at the second annual Fiber College, Friday through Sunday, Sept. 7-9, at Searsport Shores Ocean Camping Resort in Searsport. This will mark the first time Johnson has exhibited his collection. In fact, until he heard about Fiber College and was invited to participate, most of his collection was packed away in trunks and, in some instances, in the boxes the items were shipped in to his home near Sacramento, Calif. "This may have been brought to Pakistan by refugees from Afghanistan," Johnson said of what appears to be a section of a tribal garment ornamented with millions of tiny cross-stitches so small you have to squint to see them. He bought the piece in the 1980s. "The refugees would need money and they would bring things they could sell [as they fled]. This may have been made by many members of the same household." Johnson believes that the popular image of the people of the region where he worked, especially those of the Muslim faith, have been adversely portrayed by the violence prevalent there. "It’s a great mistake and a tragedy," he said, to believe that the majority of Muslims there are members of the Taliban or al-Qaida. "They are like the people here, families who need to provide for themselves, who like to celebrate. They are farmers. It was easy to work with the village people." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Bangor Daily News. "The Fabric Of The World" September 4, 2007.


2007: James Rupert writes: US loses ground as Afghanistan erodes

Afghanistan has slipped backward into a political "danger zone," the Center for Strategic and International Studies warned in March. In the broadest published evaluation of Afghans' attitudes, the center said Afghans are facing worsened physical security; greater threats from warlords, criminal gangs and corrupt officials; and more difficulty in supporting their families. In the battle against the Taliban for Afghans' hearts and minds, "support for America and for [Afghan President Hamid] Karzai is becoming less every day," said Eissa Wahdat, an Afghan government engineer who coordinates small development projects in Nuristan. Journalist James Rupert, head of Newsday's international bureau in Islamabad, Pakistan began his career abroad as a Peace Corps volunteer, teaching mechanics and welding in Morocco. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Seattle Times. "U.s. Loses Ground As Afghanistan Erodes" September 20, 2007.


2007: Dr. Thomas Gouttierre will be visiting scholar at the Václav Havel Civil Society Symposium

He speaks and writes Afghan Persian, Iranian Persian and Tajikistani Persian, and also has studied Arabic, French, German, Latin, Russian and Spanish. He was the project director of the development of the Dari-English Dictionary, and his publications include many articles on Afghanistan culture and a two-volume language textbook, “Dari for Foreigners.” Thomas Gouttierre, dean of International Studies and Programs and director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Afghanistan in the 1960's. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: University of St. Thomas. "Leading Expert On Afghanistan Will Be Visiting Scholar Here Starting Oct. 6" September 21, 2007.


2007: James Rupert writes: Attacks by Taliban mounting

Barnett Rubin, an expert on Afghanistan at New York University, says leaders in Washington "utterly failed" to understand what was needed after the Taliban rout, which started with airstrikes on Oct. 7, 2001, less than a month after the Sept. 11 attacks in Washington and New York. "The Bush administration did not see Afghanistan as a long-term commitment, and its leaders deceived themselves into thinking they had won an irreversible victory. They did not consider Afghanistan important and always intended to focus on Iraq," he said. "Now the U.S. and international community have fallen way behind, and the Taliban are winning strategically ... " Journalist James Rupert, head of Newsday's international bureau in Islamabad, Pakistan began his career abroad as a Peace Corps volunteer, teaching mechanics and welding in Morocco. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Newsday. "Attacks By Taliban Mounting" October 6, 2007.


2007: Afghanistan RPCV Pat Nyhan writes "Zigzag: A Working Woman's Life in Changing Times"

In sparkling prose, Pat Nyhan describes how she grew up in 1940s Chicago and broke out of the traditional female roles to become a newspaper reporter. But juggling family and work had its price and Nyhan often found herself having to make difficult adjustments. Still, as this moving memoir proves, those changes resulted in an ultimately rich and rewarding work life. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: PR Web. "Powerful Memoir Explores How Changing Times Influence A Woman's" October 11, 2007.


2007: A fellow named Thomas Gouttierre is speaking in our community this week. He is a go-to expert on Afghanistan whose life should someday be a major motion picture.

Gouttierre and his center have raised eyebrows for their ties to U.S. government agencies and to a private oil company that wanted to build a pipeline in Afghanistan. The State Department asks him for advice and the U.N. hired him for its peacekeeping mission in the mid-1990s. (One of his tasks was to find Osama bin Laden, then barely on the radar as a dangerous jihadist. He says he determined his location within a few hours.) He once told a reporter for the Lincoln (Neb.) Journal Star that his sister doesn't believe him when he swears he's not a CIA agent. After 9/11, Gouttierre's visibility as an Afghanistan expert put the Omaha campus (the one where the famed Cornhuskers don't play) on the map. Thomas Gouttierre, dean of International Studies and Programs and director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Afghanistan in the 1960's. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Pioneer Press. "Inviting Progress" October 11, 2007.


2007: James Rupert writes: Two years after his death in Afghanistan, Lt. Michael P. Murphy awarded the Medal of Honor

Murphy, 29 at the time of his death, becomes the first Medal of Honor winner for combat service in Afghanistan, and the first sailor recipient since the Vietnam War. He is the 18th Long Islander to win the award. Four U.S. Army soldiers from Long Island won the honor for service in Vietnam, where Daniel Murphy served and was awarded the Purple Heart for battlefield wounds. Murphy is credited with putting his life in danger in an effort to save the lives of three of his subordinates during a fierce firefight in eastern Afghanistan near the Pakistan border in June 2005. That month, Murphy and three other SEALs -- Petty Officer Matt Axelson, 29, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Danny Dietz, 25 -- were inserted by helicopter onto a remote mountaintop near the border. They were four men on a secret mission to track a high-ranking Taliban warlord, Newsday reported last May. But they were discovered first by an Afghan goat herder who stumbled upon their hiding place in a mountainside forest. Not long after, the four SEALs were surrounded by dozens of armed insurgents, and a fierce battle ensued. The lone survivor of the incident, Petty Officer 1st Class Marcus Luttrell, 29, of Texas, has called Murphy, the team's leader, "an iron-souled warrior of colossal, almost unbelievable courage." According to Luttrell's account, as told to Navy superiors and in a recently published book, Murphy displayed "an extreme act of valor" when he ran into the open -- and suffered a bullet wound when he did -- in a last-ditch attempt to call for help and save his fellow SEALs.Journalist James Rupert, head of Newsday's international bureau in Islamabad, Pakistan began his career abroad as a Peace Corps volunteer, teaching mechanics and welding in Morocco. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Newsday. "Slain Patchogue Seal Receives Highest Honor" October 12, 2007.


2007: Sarah Chayes says the Taliban have scored a major victory near Kandahar

However, no matter what the outcome in Arghandab, the Taliban have scored a major victory, said Sarah Chayes, an American writer and humanitarian who has a home in Kandahar. "What I think is key to note is the symbolic, emotional weight of the Taliban being in Arghandab," Chayes said. "Even if the government and ISAF drive them back out in short order, which looks like it's going to happen, they have scored major (psychological operations) points." The significance of Arghandab district is difficult to overstate, she said. "It's like a bulwark of the city. It's where the mujahedeen were based when they were fighting the Soviets, and no one could dislodge them from there," Chayes said. "This whole thing has cast a terrible pall on everyone's mood. Everyone in Arghandab now has to doubt his own neighbor. (It's) a district that used to be a carefree garden." Morocco RPCV Sarah Chayes has made a home in Kandahar, Afghanistan, became fluent in Pashto, one of the main Afghan languages, and devoted her energies to rebuilding a country gutted by two decades of war. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: CanWest News Service. "Nato Forces Push Taliban Away From Kandahar City" November 1, 2007.


2007: Thomas Gouttierre to to talk about democracy in Afghanistan in Texas A&M

"It is important that students are informed on their government's involvement abroad," Gunter said. "Mr. Gouttierre is considered by many to be the leading expert on Afghanistan, and his hands-on experience will allow students to develop informed opinions about the current situation there." Thomas Gouttierre, dean of International Studies and Programs and director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Afghanistan in the 1960's. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The Batt. "Mideast Expert To Lecture In Msc" November 5, 2007.


2007: Sarah Chayes writes: A Mullah Dies, and War Comes Knocking

What had in fact transpired, in my view, was a deft, successful psychological operations action by the Taliban. Their attack on Arghandab was designed to communicate, and it did -- eloquently. It said that they are here. It said that, despite the likelihood that they would attack after the death of Mullah Naqib, no obstacle was thrown up to oppose them, and they were able to walk into the district. The targeting of the mullah's house was a deliberate affront. It said: "You see, o men of no honor? You can't even protect his house. You are nothing now." The sum of these messages was aimed at the ordinary people who are the prize in any insurgency: Our encroachment is inevitable, the Taliban said. You should align yourselves with the inevitable. In the end, after three days of fighting, the Taliban were not crushed in the jaws of a closing trap, as we had been led to expect. They executed a disciplined, fighting withdrawal -- one of the most difficult maneuvers on a battlefield. Even their retreat emphasized their message. Now, Kandaharis fear, they will quietly capitalize on this psy-ops victory. They will visit the villages and the mosques in tiny groups. They will instill their poison, a savant dose of seduction ("Brother, we have nothing against you; you are a Muslim, and we love you. Our fight is with the infidels. Let us pass") and terror: a "collaborator" tracked down and cut into pieces, a suicide bomber at a normally tranquil village crossroads. They will work to turn the people toward the inevitable. All of this is a pattern familiar from other districts. What troubles me more is evidence that the battle for Arghandab may have been a piece of psy-ops mounted by a different set of actors, aimed at a different audience, against a backdrop of diplomatic initiatives that would have been unthinkable a few short years ago. There is suddenly this backbeat -- persistent references in the media, unchallenged pronouncements by Karzai -- that the only way to end the "insurgency" is to negotiate, to invite the Taliban back to share power. This is a seductive refrain. After all, wasn't the IRA brought to the table? Didn't Yasser Arafat win a Nobel Peace Prize? Isn't it true that insurgencies are never defeated, that they are always accommodated in the end through negotiations? Except these Taliban are not home-grown insurgents. These Taliban, I have become convinced by evidence gathered over the past six years, were reconstituted into a force for mischief by the military establishment -- in other words, it seems to me, the government -- of Pakistan, as a proxy fighting force to advance Pakistan's long-cherished agenda: to control all or part of Afghanistan, directly or indirectly. Morocco RPCV Sarah Chayes has made a home in Kandahar, Afghanistan, became fluent in Pashto, one of the main Afghan languages, and devoted her energies to rebuilding a country gutted by two decades of war. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Washington Post. "A Mullah Dies, And War Comes Knocking" November 18, 2007.


2007: Sarah Chayes writes: Scents & Sensibility

"This is what we do: Eleven Afghan men and women and I scour this harried land for its (licit) bounties and turn them into beauty products. Our soaps, colored with local vegetable dyes and hand-molded and smoothed till they look like lumps of marble, and our oils, elixirs for polishing the skin, sell in boutiques that cater to the pampered in New York, Montreal, and San Francisco. The scale of the effort—we sell about $2,500 worth of soap per month—is tiny. Still, our business, the Arghand Cooperative, represents what reports and think tanks say places like Afghanistan need: sustainable economic development. And it is almost entirely the product of private enthusiasm and generosity. From the institutional donors whose job I naively thought was to foster initiatives like ours, we have reaped much travail but almost no support. " Morocco RPCV Sarah Chayes has made a home in Kandahar, Afghanistan, became fluent in Pashto, one of the main Afghan languages, and devoted her energies to rebuilding a country gutted by two decades of war. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The Atlantic. "Scents & Sensibility" December 1, 2007.


2007: Thomas Gouttierre says Benazir Bhutto will be remembered as the first woman to lead a Muslim country and a beloved symbol of democracy and modernization to many Pakistanis

Benazir Bhutto will be remembered as the first woman to lead a Muslim country and a beloved symbol of democracy and modernization to many Pakistanis, said Thomas Gouttierre, dean of international studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a Central Asia expert. She also will be remembered for her checkered record as prime minister, Gouttierre said, during which she and her husband were accused of stealing more than a billion dollars from the government. Members of Bhutto's Cabinet also quietly aligned with extremists like the Taliban during her second term as prime minister, Gouttierre said. Thomas Gouttierre, dean of International Studies and Programs and director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Afghanistan in the 1960's. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Omaha World-Herald . "Expert At Uno Sees A Complicated Future For Pakistan" December 27, 2007.


References

  1. Green Bay Press-Gazette. "Guest Column: Afghan Winter Cold, But Not Like Home" February 10, 2007.
  2. The Monroe Times. "Hanging In There" March 24, 2007.
  3. The Northern Echo. "Into The Soul Of Afghanistan" April 13, 2007.
  4. The Independent. "The Punishment Of Virtue, By Sarah Chayes" April 24, 2007.
  5. Newsday. "U.s.-Led Forces Kill Taliban Field Commander" May 14, 2007.
  6. Pittsburgh Post Gazette. "Beaver Native Lifts Children's Hopes In Kabul" June 10, 2007.
  7. International Herald Tribune. "Nato Didn't Lose Afghanistan" July 10, 2007.
  8. Earth Times. "The Asia Foundation Names Dr. Jon Summers As New Country Representative In Pakistan" August 2, 2007.
  9. Bangor Daily News. "The Fabric Of The World" September 4, 2007.
  10. Seattle Times. "U.s. Loses Ground As Afghanistan Erodes" September 20, 2007.
  11. University of St. Thomas. "Leading Expert On Afghanistan Will Be Visiting Scholar Here Starting Oct. 6" September 21, 2007.
  12. Newsday. "Attacks By Taliban Mounting" October 6, 2007.
  13. PR Web. "Powerful Memoir Explores How Changing Times Influence A Woman's" October 11, 2007.
  14. Pioneer Press. "Inviting Progress" October 11, 2007.
  15. Newsday. "Slain Patchogue Seal Receives Highest Honor" October 12, 2007.
  16. CanWest News Service. "Nato Forces Push Taliban Away From Kandahar City" November 1, 2007.
  17. The Batt. "Mideast Expert To Lecture In Msc" November 5, 2007.
  18. Washington Post. "A Mullah Dies, And War Comes Knocking" November 18, 2007.
  19. The Atlantic. "Scents & Sensibility" December 1, 2007.
  20. Omaha World-Herald . "Expert At Uno Sees A Complicated Future For Pakistan" December 27, 2007.
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