Peace Corps Afghanistan: 2004

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Peace Corps was active in Afghanistan from 1962 to 1976. Although President Bush proposed returning the Peace Corps to the country in 2002, the security situation in the country has not allowed a return to Afghanistan but the legacy of the Peace Corps' fourteen years in Afghanistan lives on in the many RPCVs who lives were deeply affected by their work in the country and in the many RPCVs who served in other countries but who now work in Afghanistan in civil affairs, diplomacy, as aid workers in NGO's and as journalists. RPCVs with an Afghan connection include Thomas Gouttierre who became Director of the Center of Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in 1974; Sarah Chayes (RPCV Morocco) who since 2002 has been responsible for rebuilding homes and schools, creating employment for about 300 people and launching today's most popular local radio station in Kandahar; James Rupert (RPCV Morocco) who has reported on on Afghanistan since the 1980's for Newsday, Bloomberg, and the Washington Post; and Ben Rosen (RPCV Iran) who since 1995 has worked with Teacher's College to produce textbooks, design curriculum, recruit teachers and help local ministries take over these tasks and who returned to Afghanistan in 2003 to help reopen the college.

Peace Corps was active in Afghanistan from 1962 to 1976. Although President Bush proposed returning the Peace Corps to the country in 2002, the security situation in the country has not allowed a return to Afghanistan but the legacy of the Peace Corps' fourteen years in Afghanistan lives on in the many RPCVs who lives were deeply affected by their work in the country and in the many RPCVs who served in other countries but who now work in Afghanistan in civil affairs, diplomacy, as aid workers in NGO's and as journalists. RPCVs with an Afghan connection include Thomas Gouttierre who became Director of the Center of Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in 1974; Sarah Chayes (RPCV Morocco) who since 2002 has been responsible for rebuilding homes and schools, creating employment for about 300 people and launching today's most popular local radio station in Kandahar; James Rupert (RPCV Morocco) who has reported on on Afghanistan since the 1980's for Newsday, Bloomberg, and the Washington Post; and Ben Rosen (RPCV Iran) who since 1995 has worked with Teacher's College to produce textbooks, design curriculum, recruit teachers and help local ministries take over these tasks and who returned to Afghanistan in 2003 to help reopen the college.


Contents

2004

2004: Afghanistan RPCV Nina Davidson Arnold publishes Journal while fighting Ovarian Cancer

Nina Arnold had a successful career in textiles, mostly weaving, following a two-year Peace Corps stint with her husband in Afghanistan during the 1960s. Since then, they have traveled widely in the United States, exhibiting her work at local and national art shows from April through November each year. During the 1990s, however, Arnold's health deteriorated. To conserve her strength, she switched from weaving to less stressful fiber and paper collage artwork. It was in May 1997 that she was diagnosed with stage IV ovarian cancer, which means that the disease had already metastasized and traveled to other parts of her body. She started to keep a journal of her battle with cancer, which helped greatly over the two years it took her to write her book. In the first entry, May 24, 1997, she noted that she was somewhat fearful about her upcoming surgery -- her first -- but that she hoped her husband's support and her religious faith would see her through. That first surgery -- a total abdominal hysterectomy -- was 90 per cent effective, she later wrote, leaving two inoperable spots of cancer, one on her liver and one on her diaphragm that required postoperative chemotherapy. So she started on the first of 10 different courses of chemotherapy over the next 51/2 years. She lost her hair within two weeks and eventually became adept at wearing wigs and hats. "I attempted to deal with the disease by enjoying any pleasurable moment that presented itself," she wrote. "I relaxed on the deck, practiced the piano, visited with friends, and spent time in my studio creating artwork." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: The Southern. "Ben Gelman: Woman Publishes Journal While Fighting Ovarian Cancer" January 8, 2004.


2004: Lance Holter built wells in Tunisia in 1972-73 and is now a real-estate broker and a building and plumbing contractor on Maui. The Peace Corps, he says, should "wage peace," not war.

Years after the Peace Corps, he traveled through Afghanistan in the winter of 1978 before the assassination of the last pro-Western leaders and the beginning of the Soviet occupation. "I witnessed the last days of a wonderful thriving culture where women taught at schools, practiced medicine, went to college and even wore skirts without veils. The fruit stands and marketplaces were fantastic and bustling, the farms productive (and) the people had hope. It was a safe and an amazing place," Holter said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Honolulu Advertiser. "Lance Holter Built Wells In Tunisia In 1972-73 And Is Now A Real-Estate Broker And A Building And Plumbing Contractor On Maui. The Peace Corps, He Says, Should "Wage Peace," Not War." January 25, 2004.


2004: Afghanistan RPCV Robert P, Moynihan dies in Boston

After graduation, Mr. Moynihan served in the Peace Corps and was stationed overseas in Afghanistan. He enlisted in the Army in 1976 and retired in 1996 with the rank of master sergeant. During his 20 years, he served as an intelligence analyst and in the Persian Gulf War. He was fluent in five languages. He received a Meritorious Service Medal, three Army Commendation Medals, six Army Good Conduct Medals, three NCO Professional Development Ribbons, an Army Service Ribbon, three Overseas Service Ribbons and an Army Superior Unit Award. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Boston Herald. "Obituary; Robert P, Moynihan, 62, Army Master Sergeant" January 29, 2004.


2004: Photos from Afghanistan by RPCV John Patrick Patten

I spent the first fifteen months in post-Taliban Afghanistan working for a humanitarian aid agency in Mazar-i-Sharif in northern Afghanistan. It was a remarkable experience, as I was fortunate enough to travel farther afield on surveys and more extensively around the country than most of the other foreigners there. It became home in a way and I still remember fondly the people and places we visited. I took over a thousand photographs during my travels on a variety of topics and would like to present some of them here, as it was a labor of love. Afghanistan is a beautiful, complex country at the crossroads of history, with wonderful people despite the well-documented problems. I tried to take some photos of normal life and people enjoying themselves at times instead of solely the war damage and suffering so common in the mainstream media, who often did not venture outside of Kabul. There is suffering, and countries must work not to abandon the promises we made (this is happening now), but believe it or not people there do get through life with some of the same joys, difficulties, and family celebrations that we all have, in spite of the hardships most of us do not understand. How well you are doing often has to do with who you are, where you are, and in which time period. Many localized coping strategies had developed, however they are under strain now. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Personal Web Site. "Photos From Afghanistan" February 3, 2004.


2004: Afghanistan RPCV Daniel Koch gives global artisans an economic edge

Koch began to build his credentials for such an undertaking as far back as the early 1970s, when he first lived in Afghanistan as a Peace Corps volunteer. He's been back to visit since then, traveling in Pakistan, India, Indonesia and the Philippines over a period of 20 years while developing relationships with manufacturers for his furniture import business. One can easily imagine this tall, lean, unassuming man with his mat of reddish hair quietly observing and and earning the trust and perhaps friendship of his interlocutors. On his latest journey to Afghanistan, Koch found more candidates for microcredit than one agency could handle. He met a potter in Kunduz who sold his wares to local markets for little money. And now a main road leading out of his town is impassable due to bomb damage, obliterating hope of reaching a larger market such as Kabul since the potter can't afford the more expensive route over the mountains. "A micro loan would enable him to send a shipment out," Koch explains. "And if he had good new designs -- which we worked on together a bit -- he could theoretically sell his goods to a larger marketplace." Koch also spoke to a leather tanner in Kunduz whose production slows to a trickle in the winter because he has trouble drying the leather. He said all he needed was a drying space with a roof on it, not necessarily even a building, to continue his production during the winter months. That too could be obtained with a micro loan, Koch said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Portland Tribune. "Trade Moves" February 17, 2004.


2004: When the position became available at the Center for Women, I actively lobbied for it," recalls Afghanistan RPCV Jennet Alterman. "I had learned from experience in the Peace Corps that the only way to bring about positive sustainable success for individuals is to do it at the grassroots, village level and to start by educating people.

"I’m a typical Southerner," says Alterman. "I grew up here in Charleston and with Southern expectations for what women can and can’t do, but I’d never faced direct gender discrimination. Then, while I was away at an all girls’ college, I was given an opportunity to attend a [prestigious, Southern] men’s college for one year." It was a year that forged the direction of Alterman’s life. "This was back in the early 70s when many single-sex colleges were grappling with going coed, and I was one of ten ‘trial’ women. When I got to this men’s school and people said to me: ‘You can’t do that because you are a woman,’ it was a shock to my system. Luckily, instead of running into a corner and biting my tail I got angry. And it was a wonderful learning curve for me." Alterman’s first job out of school taught her even more about gender inequality. "Television broadcasting was one of many fields in which men were, and in many places still are, routinely paid more than women for the same work." Then, as a Peace Corps volunteer: "My assignment in the late 70s was to work in health education in Afghanistan. I ran headlong into health discrimination—reproductive health inequities that were shocking to me as an American and a woman. So what I found between my first three experiences as a young woman was just how really difficult it was to be a woman on this planet. And it’s been reinforced by other jobs that I’ve held." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: C4Women. "One Left Behind" March 1, 2004.


2004: Caryn Giles Lawson was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan in the late '70s and loves Afghan food for sentimental reasons and simply because it's delicious!

"I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan in the late '70s. I love Afghan food for sentimental reasons and simply because it's delicious! e-mailed Caryn Giles Lawson of Los Gatos. Lawson included a recipe for firni, an Afghan custard that she says has a looser consistency than ``American-style puddings. She eats the pudding cold or slightly warm, and she recommends grinding your own cardamom seeds. While the pudding may be poured into individual serving dishes, a communal serving dish is more Afghan-style, Lawson explains. ``Enjoy, or as Afghans would say, `Nosh-I Jahn!' Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Mercury News. "A Culinary Trip To Afghanistan" March 17, 2004.


2004: Sarah Chayes to kick off Lecture Series

Chayes will speak at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 8 at VCU’s Grace St. Theatre, 934 W. Grace Street. Chayes joined NPR as a foreign correspondent in 1997, and reported from Paris, Algeria, Lebanon, Israel-Palestine, Serbia and Bosnia. Her work also brought her to Afghanistan, where she covered the fall of the Taliban. Afterwards, Chayes left NPR and journalism to focus on Afghans for Civil Society, a non-governmental, non-profit aid organization in Kandahar. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: VCU. "Hans Blix, Sarah Chayes To Kickoff Vcu Lecture Series" March 24, 2004.


2004: Afghanistan RPCV Dennis Aaronson will discuss his eight years of service in the Peace Corps

Dennis Aaronson will discuss his eight years of service in the Peace Corps in Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia and Lebanon from 6 to 7 p.m. May 14 at the Elk Grove Community Library, 8962 Elk Grove Blvd., Elk Grove. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Sacramento Bee. "Middle East Talk Set" April 18, 2004.


2004: Dan Lutz, who has done Peace Corps work in Afghanistan and Iran, builds Arabic language program in Denver schools

Dan Lutz is familiar with building a language program. The head of West High's Center for International Studies already has done it at the school, most recently with Chinese, another less commonly taught language. Arabic, though, presented its own particular issues. Simply finding a teacher delayed the start of the program by a semester. High school-level textbooks in Arabic are hard to find. "So far, we haven't found them," Lutz said of the books. So Neji Sandi, the teacher, "is writing the entire thing," including objectives and goals for a four-year program. When complete, it will include four years of Arabic language, a middle school component, Arabic culture classes and student trips to the Middle East. Not that Lutz has much money to spend on his ambitious plan. "We're doing it on a shoestring," he said. Some leftover grant money, about $4,500, planted the seed for the program a year ago. Samba N'Diaye, foreign language supervisor for Denver Public Schools, called Lutz and asked about interest in Arabic. "That was all I needed," said Lutz, who has done Peace Corps work in Afghanistan and Iran. "I ran all over the school with surveys, 'Who wants to take Arabic?' " He found enough interest to begin a class in January 2003, but that fell through when a teacher wasn't available. Lutz started talking with members of Denver's Islamic Center and with Crescent View. He also approached Sandi, who teaches math at the Community College of Denver. The Center for International Studies Foundation, which typically helps students with money for overseas trips, kicked in a matching $4,500 grant. Lutz estimates it will take four to five years to get the program fully up and running - if he is able to secure more grant money to hire Sandi full time. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Rocky Mountain News. "Attention Turns To Arabic" April 26, 2004.


2004: Morocco RPCV Sarah Chayes continues work in Afghanistan

Chayes, visiting the United States as she occasionally does, will give a talk at Stanford University to describe her work, and the reality of a place too often covered in less than two minutes on the television news. She was saying goodbye to the brother of Afghan President Hamid Karzai when he asked if she would stay. "I was putting on my coat and it was like a flash," Chayes said during a telephone interview from New York. "It's not as if I hadn't been toying with the idea, but I'm not a doctor, I'm not an engineer, and I didn't want to be anybody's P.R. officer." With Karzai's request in front of her, she quit her job with National Public Radio and went to work for Afghans for a Civil Society, an organization working to rebuild the country and to build new relationships with the outside world. Chayes concentrated much of her effort in one village, negotiating and maneuvering through the complicated system of traditional political and social structure. Her new project is building a dairy cooperative, but her goal is to encourage grass-roots development that in turn will foster political change. With the dairy cooperative, "we're working them back to collective decision making, to have meetings with member farmers, to think about ways to invest, to think and plan ahead," she said. Success will mean an economic alternative to growing opium poppies. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Mercury News. "Journalist Turns To Afghan Aid" May 8, 2004.


2004: Mark L. Schneider, Sr. testifies to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on "Afghanistan – Continuing Challenges"

Al-Qaeda and Taliban attacks on UN, NGOs and Afghan government officials have nearly doubled over the past four months compared to last year. More NGO staff were killed in these first four months than all of 2003. Two schools recently rebuilt with international aid were burned down in a village south of Kandahar and a senior Muslim cleric critical of the Taliban was assassinated in Kandahar city. And it is not limited to the south and southeast. Only last week, two British private security contractors and an Afghan elections worker were killed in the north eastern province of Nuristan. A year ago, Secretary Rumsfeld spoke of having US troops leaving Afghanistan by June of this year. There needs to be a clearer understanding that achieving real security on the ground is the only way to pave the way for a successful exit strategy. We were pleased to note that last month there was an increase of some 2,000 US Marines, bringing US forces up to 15,500. These troops need to be there-and maybe even more troops need to be there until Afghan security forces are capable of defending the country against whatever remains of an armed al-Qaeda and Taliban military forces. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: US Senate. "Testimony By Mark L. Schneider, Sr. Vice President, International Crisis Group, To The Senate Foreign Relations Committee On "Afghanistan – Continuing Challenges"" May 12, 2004.


2004: RPCV Thomas Gouttierre testifies to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on "Afghanistan – Continuing Challenges"

The continuing security, political, and economic challenges to the reconstruction of Afghanistan remain formidable. The most critical is security. It negatively affects all other factors. The lack of security is perhaps the only factor that might ensure a return of a stateless society to Afghanistan. The three primary security threats are terrorists, drug lords, and war lords. These are holdovers, protagonists, and allies from the period of protracted civil war in Afghanistan. Though routed out of their strongholds and camps after 9/11, replenished and reorganized elements of Al Qaida and the Taliban remain at large and constitute a threat, both real and symbolic, to the overall reconstruction effort. They gain financial support from drug interests. These elements threaten Afghan teachers, students, election workers and other government workers, even shopowners and farmers. They threaten them with death or other bodily harm if they teach, go to school, register to vote or assist the election process, or appear to side with the government. International assistance workers and military forces are also threatened; some have been killed. The continuing capacity of these terrorists to intimidate slows and even terminates reconstruction efforts. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: US Senate. "Testimony Of Thomas E. Gouttierre Dean, International Studies And Programs Director, Center For Afghanistan Studies Before The Senate Committee On Foreign Relations" May 12, 2004.


2004: Schneider and Gouttierre say Terrorists put progress at risk in Afghanistan

Thomas Gouttierre, director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, said the al-Qaida and Taliban terrorists who were routed following the Sept. 11 attack on the United States have been "replenished and reorganized." "The continuing capacity of these terrorists to intimidate slows and even terminates reconstruction efforts," he said. Gouttierre and Schneider testified last week at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on reconstruction. "Despite many successes on the ground, the prospect that we could fail in Afghanistan is very real," said Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., chairman of the committee. "Too little assistance to Afghanistan has been provided, and often, it has come too late to address the daunting needs of that country." Gouttierre and other experts told the committee that Afghanistan's security faces a threefold threat from resurgent terrorists, from warlords who control especially the rural areas and from drug lords whose poppy crop accounts for half of the country's gross domestic product. Men who want legitimate jobs "are vulnerable to those who would employ them away from the process of reconstruction into the militias of warlords and the cultivation of poppies," Gouttierre said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Omaha World Herald. "Terrorists Put Progress At Risk In Afghanistan" May 16, 2004.


2004: Sarah Chayes on Afghanistan @ Stanford University

Sarah Chayes, former NPR correspondent and field director of Afghans for Civil Society, spends each day working to improve conditions for ordinary Afghans in the heart of Taliban country. In less than two years, flanked by a team of dedicated Afghans, she has been responsible for rebuilding homes and schools, creating employment for about 300 people and launching today's most popular local radio station in Kandahar. Currently, her energy is devoted to developing a dairy cooperative that will include over 150 families. Her talk will examine some of the myths and hard truths about the reconstuctions of Afghanistan. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Muslim Wake up. "Sarah Chayes On Afghanistan @ Stanford University" May 20, 2004.


2004: Sarah Chayes says "It's hard for an American -- even as "embedded" an American as me -- to fully guage the joint effects of disillusionment and the Iraq prison scandal on Afghans' attitude toward the current regime and its US shepherds."

It's hard for an American -- even as "embedded" an American as me -- to fully guage the joint effects of disillusionment and the Iraq prison scandal on Afghans' attitude toward the current regime and its US shepherds. Fortunately, in a way, access to visual images -- television or press with pictures -- remains very limited in Afghanistan, so the full impact of events in Iraq was probably muted. On the other hand, there has been one clear consequence: ordinary Afghans will now be much less willing to cooperate with US forces in hunting down insurgent Taliban. Believing that Abu Ghraib represents the typical lot of prisoners in US hands (particularly since there were similar stories emanating from the army detention center here in Kandahar), almost no Afghan would turn another in to face it. So the impact on the "anti-terror campaign" at least, is negative. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Trust in Education. "Kandahar, May 29, 2004" May 29, 2004.


2004: RPCV Leslie Wilson Offers First-hand Account of Life in War-torn Afghanistan

Wilson, a former Peace Corps worker in Thailand and Moldova, will provide a first-hand account of the status of women, education and development in war-torn Afghanistan. Save the Children was founded in the United States in 1932 as a non-profit child assistance organization. Today, Save the Children serves 19 states in this country as well as 47 other countries in the developing world. The organization's goal is to help children and families improve their health, education and economic situation. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Saint Mary's College. "Saint Mary's Alumna Offers First-Hand Account Of Life In War-Torn Afghanistan" May 31, 2004.


2004: The State Department, Agency for International Development, CIA, Agriculture Department, Peace Corps and other components of the federal government that might have a role to play in a nation-building operation have made few preparations to do so

America is not serious about nation-building, but it needs to get serious, because only nation-building can address the causes of state failure that threaten national security and international peace. Nation-building involves numerous activities that are not properly found anywhere in the U.S. government. Some nation-building jobs include infrastructure building and rebuilding, provision of security, development of governance institutions, and provision of basic services and welfare functions until permanent governments can be developed to take on those tasks. In part because of its historical experience with nation-building, the U.S. Army has developed some of the components necessary to perform these tasks, at least in a rudimentary fashion. No other branch of the armed services, or civilian component of the federal government, has done that much. And the Army has never been excited about nation-building operations and has never made developing an appropriate force structure, doctrine or training in such operations a priority. Without the capability to carry out such missions, the United States cannot achieve strategic victory in places such as Iraq or Afghanistan and cannot win the war on terrorism. Strategic victory is attained not only through defense of the homeland or offense against terrorists, but by helping other nations to create accountable governments and economies. That eliminates the conditions that foster discontent and anti-American terror. America needs not only an army of warriors, but an army of builders. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Baltimore Sun. "A Victory Requires Army Of Builders" June 6, 2004.


2004: Imagine sending Peace Corps workers with tools instead of Marines with rifles to Iraq, Afghanistan and Iran

Indeed, no less a Muslim figure than Pervez Musharraf, the leader of Pakistan, has issued a call for an "Enlightened Moderation" by the Islamic world. In a column written for the Washington Post (printed above), Musharraf said terrorism "has created a lethal force that is all but impossible to counter. The unfortunate reality is that both the perpetrators of these crimes and most of the people who suffer from them are Muslims." Musharraf's call for an "Enlightened Moderation" by fellow Muslims is a two-pronged strategy. One calls for the Muslim world to shun militancy and extremism and to focus on social and economic gains. The second calls for the West, and the United States in particular, to "seek to resolve all political disputes with justice and to aid in the socioeconomic betterment of the deprived Muslim world." At last! Recognition by a responsible leader of a Muslim nation of the true threat posed by international terrorism and of Muslims' duty to forego it as a solution to their problems. At last! A call from a respected Muslim leader for believers to disprove the perception that Islam "is a religion of militancy in conflict with modernization, democracy and secularism." The very use of the word "enlightened" by Musharraf is symbolically important. Remember, the Enlightenment was the label given to the period in the 18th century in western Europe when traditional social, religious and political ideas were rejected in favor of rationalism. It was a marked departure from the Dark Ages thinking of medieval times. Enlightenment ideals inspired leaders like Thomas Jefferson to found this country on such principles as the equality of human beings, freedom of speech, religion and the press, and representative government. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Brandeton Times. "Pendulum Turning? Saudi Crackdown Is A Hopeful Sign" June 6, 2004.


2004: Afghanistan RPCV Jennet Robinson Alterman is Executive Director of Charleston Center for Women

Goal yet to be achieved: World peace and to have the Center for Women recognized as the premier resource in the community for women entrepreneurs and all business owners seeking both professional and personal development opportunities for themselves and their employees. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Charleston Post Courier. "Ceo Profile" June 7, 2004.


2004: Jennet Robinson Alterman is Program Moderator for National Association for Continence

Jennet Robinson Alterman is a native of Charleston and currently serves as the Executive Director of the Center for Women. She began her career as a television news reporter and anchor for WCSC-TV. In 1977, she went to Afghanistan as a Peace Corps Volunteer working in maternal health education. Upon her return to the U.S., she worked as a Producer Director of the Health Communications Network at MUSC and then went on to serve as Lt. Governor Nancy Stevenson’s Press Secretary. She subsequently held management positions with the State Budget and Control Board until her appointment as Country Director of the Peace Corps program in Swaziland. In 2001, she accepted the position with the Center for Women. Mrs. Alterman serves on the Board of Directors of the Footlight Players and the Ashley Hall Advisory Committee. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: National Association for Continence. "Program Moderator — Jennet Robinson Alterman" June 7, 2004.


2004: Mark Schneider is the Afghanistan expert for the International Crisis Group, where he’s also senior vice-president. Mr Schneider has recently testified before the US Senate on the situation in Afghanistan

I think that there’s a great deal of doubt about NATO’s willingness and capacity to respond. We’ve been following the situation in Afghanistan closely, and that in a sense is a first priority in terms of NATO itself. The problem is that it acquired the responsibility essentially to help provide international presence with respect to security last fall, and recognised immediately in taking over this responsibility from individual countries that to provide security it needed to do it not just in Kabul but outside Kabul, which required more than the, at that time, 5,000 troops. It needed somewhere around, at least double that. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: ABC. "Mark Schneider Is The Afghanistan Expert For The International Crisis Group, Where He’s Also Senior Vice-President. Mr Schneider Has Recently Testified Before The Us Senate On The Situation In Afghanistan And He Spoke To Me A Short Time Ago From Washington." June 10, 2004.


2004: Former Peace Corps Director Mark Schneider, senior vice president at the International Crisis Group in Washington, a nonprofit organization that studies wars and works to resolve conflicts, said Karzai had painted a somewhat rosy picture of gains in his country. It's not clear that elections will take place as scheduled, Schneider said, and this year's opium harvest is expected to be the country's largest.

Mark Schneider, senior vice president at the International Crisis Group in Washington, a nonprofit organization that studies wars and works to resolve conflicts, said Karzai had painted a somewhat rosy picture of gains in his country. It's not clear that elections will take place as scheduled, Schneider said, and this year's opium harvest is expected to be the country's largest. "If you assume that the White House's purpose was to demonstrate that the administration's policies were successful, I don't think he did that, because the reality is that there are many serious problems with the policy, starting with security," Schneider said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: LA Times. "Karzai Applauds Washington, Where The Feeling Is Mutual" June 16, 2004.


2004: When Thomas Gouttierre, director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, came to Scottsbluff in February 2002 to speak at Western Nebraska Community College, the little group began to feel a kinship with those distant people

When Thomas Gouttierre, director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, came to Scottsbluff in February 2002 to speak at Western Nebraska Community College, the little group began to feel a kinship with those distant people. Maybe, members thought, the answer was as simple as friendship. They focused on Bamiyan as a possible Sister City because they saw similarities to Nebraska's Panhandle. Both are rural areas, high and dry country where farmers struggle to grow crops in stingy soil. When UNO brought three groups of Afghan teachers to Nebraska starting in 2002, two of the three groups visiting Scottsbluff included teachers from Bamiyan. Eventually, Bamiyan and Scottsbluff-Gering formally established ties through Sister Cities International. Mohammad Rahim Aliyar, governor of Bamiyan province, visited Scottsbluff in February. Security concerns postponed initial plans for a Scottsbluff delegation to visit Bamiyan. Boeckner, Marilyn and Paul Phillips, Jim Merrigan and Pam Cooper told about this month's journey and the Sister City efforts before they left and in e-mails from Kabul last week after their visit to Bamiyan and in phone calls to Kabul. "The people here are tough because they've been through hell, yet open, friendly and optimistic," said Merrigan, a Scottsbluff real estate agent. The group left June 7, arriving in Kabul nearly 40 hours later. Gouttierre, who already was in Afghanistan, accompanied the five western Nebraskans on their trip from Kabul to Bamiyan, along with Dr. Ward Chambers of the University of Nebraska Medical Center. The 120-mile trip in two SUVs took 11 hours. Aliyar sent a truck with four armed police. The Americans talked of being greeted by most of the men of a village in one stop, and of singing a Dari song they had practiced. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Omaha World Herald. "Brotherly Love From Nebraska Sister City" June 20, 2004.


2004: Thailand RPCV Leslie Wilson finds work in Afghanistan 'rewarding'

After stints with the American Refugee Committee and the U.S. Committee for UNICEF, Wilson re-joined the Peace Corps, this time as a staff member helping to oversee the organization's operations in Moldova, a state that had been part of the Soviet Union. In 1998, she joined Save The Children, first as a development official in Chicago and then as a country representative in Bangladesh. Save The Children has been involved in Afghanistan indirectly since 1985, when the organization set up in Pakistani villages where Afghans had fled the Soviet occupation. The group first set up in Afghanistan in 1989, gingerly working around the Taliban fundamentalist government. Wilson said Save The Children focuses on improving the well-being of children around the planet. In Afghanistan, a country that has been involved in one war or another for more than 25 years, there is plenty of work to do. "One of the primary things we start with is educating the residents about the dangers of land mines and other unexploded ordinance," she said. "There are still 10 million land mines in the ground across Afghanistan, so that's a real danger." Save The Children's workers also found that there were other basic concerns that needed to be addressed, particularly as the country tries to rebound from the Taliban regime. "We found that there little things that turned out to be big concerns for the children, especially in Kabul," she said. "As the level of traffic increased in the city, the children expressed their concerns about safety crossing the roads. We've been able to work with the police to get them to understand the fear associated with all the traffic, and now, every morning, the traffic police are lined up and ready to help people get where they need to go." Little victories such as that make the job satisfying. Bigger projects, such as improving the educational system, are ongoing. "We're working to get older students, especially girls, to help tutor first- or second-grade students," she said. "Education for girls wasn't a priority for the Taliban, so that's something we're trying to establish." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Beaver County Times. "Beaver Native Finds Work In Afghanistan 'Rewarding'" June 27, 2004.


2004: RPCV Thomas E. Gouttierre says of Afghan President Hamid Karzai "The eminent power right now is our military, and his central government is competing with the warlords... . Given the conditions, he's done a remarkable job."

In the 21/2 years since Karzai took power, his central government has established its authority slowly in Kabul but exercises little or no control outside the capital, where warlords maintain order in their fiefdoms, often with tacit U.S. support in the absence of a national army. Drug trafficking has become rampant, sometimes tied to the warlords. The Taliban has reasserted control in part of the country. Few people believe conditions exist for free and fair elections, which the Bush administration wants to see take place this year. "He hasn't really been in control," said Thomas E. Gouttierre, a friend of Karzai and director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. "The eminent power right now is our military, and his central government is competing with the warlords... . Given the conditions, he's done a remarkable job." The Afghan Northern Alliance, backed by U.S.-led forces, toppled the Taliban from power in 2001, paving the way for Karzai to become president. There have been improvements since then. The number of children in school has quadrupled to four million. The average daily working wage has more than doubled, from $2.70 to $6.25. And the Finance Ministry has begun demanding that regional leaders hand over the taxes they have collected. Americans have built a modern roadway to replace a bombed-out highway linking Kabul and Kandahar - albeit at three times the $80 million budgeted cost. But for every step forward, it seems a new problem surfaces, and, in some dispiriting instances, old problems have resprouted worse than before the war. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Philadelphia Inquirer. "Karzai, Lacking Support, Struggles To Fulfill Vision" July 4, 2004.


2004: Fiji RPCV Charles M. Blomquist heading for Afghaistan in Army Civil Affairs Unit

The square shoulders, short buzz hairstyle and purposeful walk of Charles M. Blomquist do not cut the average figure of a Baltimore prosecutor. Neither does his background: a former Peace Corps volunteer, seminary student and aid worker for Catholic Relief Services. Now Blomquist, 41, who handles shooting cases in the Baltimore state's attorney's office, is going on his next mission - to Afghanistan as a major in the Army Reserves. He will supervise civil projects, such as the construction of schools and bringing electric power to impoverished towns. He will be in charge of a team of 12 civil affairs specialists, and describes his job as somewhat of a contractor. "We will be helping the villages restore a sense of civility," Blomquist said. "It's the closest thing the military has to the Peace Corps." In 1998, he began taking classes at the University of Baltimore Law School, after he and Joan had their first son, David. Andrew was born a year later. "The idea of traveling around the world wasn't conducive to family life," he said. He joined the state's attorney's office in 2001 and began working in District Court. He quickly worked his way up to the violent crime division, where his supervisors call him reliable and hard-working. "Instead of running and hiding from the military like other people, he steps up to his duty despite the fact that he has a wife and two boys," said his team captain at the prosecutors' office, William F. Cecil. "That's very telling about him." Blomquist says he feels good about the Army's purpose in Afghanistan, which is helping to bring stability to a war-torn country. "This is a country that has been at war for the majority of its existence," he said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Baltimore Sun. "His Next Call To Serve" July 7, 2004.


2004: Afghanistan RPCV John Barbee expands aid-relief operations into the Al Anbar province in Iraq

Barbee's first visit to Iraq left him frustrated and concerned about the fate of the country. "They had no plans in place," he said last fall, referring to the U.S. Department of Defense's seemingly nonexistent postwar strategy. "It was abundantly apparent by the time I left that if a plan was in place, we could have gotten a lot more done a lot faster." When L. Paul Bremer, the recently departed civilian administrator in charge of the occupation, declared the former Iraqi military defunct and eliminated its pay, Barbee claims things spiraled out of control. "Basically Bremer did nothing in that process to empower Iraqis, they just appointed a governing council of mostly expatriate Iraqis which had no positive leadership potential at all," he said. "All of a sudden, we became an occupation force with a relentless stranglehold on the country, and we had to start from scratch, worse than scratch. All these guys were alienated, it was just a mess." Distrust and national pride spread like wildfire across the country, Barbee said, as former Iraqi soldiers, who had thrown down their arms when Saddam's regime was overthrown, were now hell-bent on destroying the Americans. "We have eliminated Saddam but created a lot of other problems," he said, adding that now there is not only a distrust of the military, but of all Westerners, aid workers included. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Aspen Times. "Barbee: 'Empower' The People" July 16, 2004.


2004: Doctors Without Borders pulls out of Afghanistan, says government ignores killings of its workers

Medecins Sans Frontieres has became the first major aid agency to withdraw from Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban, saying yesterday that the government failed to act on evidence that local warlords were behind the killings of five of its staff. The Nobel Prize-winning medical relief group, also known as Doctors Without Borders, denounced the U.S. military's use of aid to persuade Afghans to snitch on insurgents, saying it risked turning all relief workers into targets. It said it was also dismayed that Taliban rebels tried to claim responsibility for the June 2 attack on its staff. "We feel that the framework for independent humanitarian action in Afghanistan at present has simply evaporated," said Kenny Gluck, MSF's director of operations. There is a "lack of respect for the safety of aid workers." The withdrawal of Medecins Sans Frontieres, which had 80 international volunteers and 1,400 Afghan staff in the country before the June attack, is the most dramatic example yet of how poor security more than two years after the fall of the Taliban is hampering the delivery of badly needed aid. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Baltimore Sun. "Aid Group Pulls Out Of Afghanistan" July 29, 2004.


2004: Afghanistan RPCV Paul Dugan takes over as the Washoe County school’s interim superintendent.

A former teacher, counselor and superintendent of elementary education in the district Dugan, 54, replaces Jim Hager, who resigned in late June to become a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Faced with a burgeoning enrollment of English as a second language students and the rigorous demands of federal No Child Left Behind Act policies, Dugan said there was a need for more resources. “The demographics of the Washoe County School District are changing,” he said during a recent interview in his office. “I think we need to look at how we allocate our resources. I don’t believe we have enough resources that are going directly for second-language learners.” Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Reno Gazette-Journal. "Former Teacher Takes Over As Interim Leader" August 2, 2004.


2004: Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Terry Dougherty helps bring students from Afghanistan to Indiana

“The purpose of the program is to develop personal friendship between American and Afghani students and have an exchange of ideas about cultures and ways of life,” Dougherty said. “American students get to meet Afghani students as real people and hopefully as friends. Afghani students get to return with a better understanding of what life and values are like in America.” Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Fort Wayne Journal Gazette. "Afghan Teens Coming To Learn – And Educate" August 4, 2004.


2004: RPCV Larry Wonderling says Afghanistan was the worst to live in and the best for fond memories

Afghanistan was the worst to live in and the best for fond memories. I arrived there in 1971 as a thin, healthy Peace Corps consultant. Two years later, I left unhealthy and 40 pounds lighter. Magnificent scenery, wonderful people and no sanitation. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: San Francisco Chronicle. "Larry Wonderling" August 20, 2004.


2004: Congo Kinshasa RPCV Michael O'Hanlon says in Sudan, Congo and Afghanistan, the imperative for urgent action is clear

In Sudan, Congo and Afghanistan, the imperative for urgent action is clear.Here and elsewhere, the international community has tolerated horrendous crimes against humanity. To address future crises, Europe - and its armies - are part of the answer. Although most European forces are badly structured for peacekeeping and intervention missions, they have some spare capacity that could even now help stabilise Congo, Sudan and Afghanistan - good alternative missions for countries unwilling to do more in Iraq. Some of America's main allies say they are doing all they can. But in 1999 and 2000, they deployed more forces on difficult missions than they have since then - sending 60,000 troops overall to Kosovo, Bosnia, East Timor, Sierra Leone and elsewhere. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Sudan Tribune. "Save Lives With Force" August 26, 2004.


2004: Former Peace Corps Director Mark Schneider -now a top official of the International Crisis Group says Afghanistan is not getting enough assistance

Afghanistan has already received a $2 billion infusion of aid as part of a $9 billion multi-year program. But former U.S. diplomat Mark Schneider -now a top official of the International Crisis Group says Afghanistan is not getting enough assistance. "Relative to the need and relative to the size of the country and relative to U.S. or international participation in other post-conflict situations, it's far too little," says Mr. Schneider. "And the absence of adequate security has made the reconstruction efforts much more fragile." The crisis group believes more peacekeeping troops need to be deployed outside the capital and more aid is required to bring stability to Afghanistan, which is one of the world's poorest countries. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: VOA News. "Analysts: Aid Effectiveness Dependent On Security In Post-Conflict Societies" August 26, 2004.


2004: Sarah Chayes has traded life on a rural dairy cooperative in Afghanistan for a temporary retreat in Paris to complete her book about the aftermath of war in the bombed-out country she has called home for more than two years

Chayes has written in detail on transom.org, the website for radio producers, about her work preparing to start up Afghan Independent Radio. A year after its launch, she told Current, “The radio has been absolutely a remarkable success. According to a recent listener poll, 74 percent of the people interviewed listened to it, compared to 52 percent for BBC. I think it’s really the first local independent radio in Afghanistan ever.” Though she had the skills to start a radio station, she said, she was ironically the one who dragged her feet the most. “Partly because I knew what it took to get radio on the air. The non-radio professionals were gung-ho.” Although grants from the Carr Foundation and others provided the equipment, the two-floor building with two soundproof studios was built from scratch, as was much of the furniture, Chayes said. Chayes emphasized basic journalism in training the staff. “We would do an interview, cut it, and comment on it, working on everything from the angle of the microphone to the substance of the interview,” she said. “While there is assistance in starting up broadcast media [in developing countries], the assistance is almost entirely technical—using the computers, the digital audio, minidisc machines, but there is very little training in journalism. How do you approach a story; how are you objective in a real way?” said Chayes. “We did a lot of work on that.” The radio station is now being considered a model for others to emulate, and when she returns, Chayes will continue her mentor role with it. Though she will continue to write and speak about her work, Chayes said she doubts that she will ever return to daily journalism, “where you parachute into a place, you don’t speak the language and grab an interpreter who has his own agenda. It leaves you very open to being deceived. ... It doesn’t give you time to subject the material to the scrutiny it needs.” Understanding the country and its culture has required her to climb an enormous learning curve, she said. “One of the more pleasurable aspects of my life now is that I can take the time to come to a real understanding of something.” Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Current. "Without A Parachute" September 20, 2004.


2004: From 1966 to 1968 George O'Bannon was Assistant Director of the Peace Corps in Afghanistan

We had the pleasure of meeting George and Helen O'Bannon in 1964 when he worked for the American friends of the Middle east, an influential organization in which we had a strong interest. From 1966 to 1968 George was Assistant Director of the Peace Corps in Afghanistan. While he travel widely in that country, Helen added to their growing family that was to number four sons: Patrick, Colin, and Sean and Casey, twins. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Rug Review. "An Irishman In Friendly Disguise" October 2, 2004.


2004: At 25, Dave Millican discovered a love of mountains and the outdoors during a 10-month stint in Afghanistan, where he worked as a Peace Corps volunteer

At 25, he discovered a love of mountains and the outdoors during a 10-month stint in Afghanistan, where he worked as a Peace Corps volunteer. "I didn't do much work there, but I gained a great humility about capability and complexity of other cultures and other countries," he said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Argus Online. "Millican Retires After 18 Years" October 6, 2004.


2004: RPCV Thomas Gouttierre told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee recently: "Though routed out of their strongholds and camps after 9/11, replenished and reorganized elements of Al Qaida and the Taliban remain at large and constitute a threat, both real and symbolic, to the overall reconstruction effort"

As Thomas Gouttierre, dean of the Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska (one of this nation's leading experts on Afghanistan), told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee recently: "Though routed out of their strongholds and camps after 9/11, replenished and reorganized elements of Al Qaida and the Taliban remain at large and constitute a threat, both real and symbolic, to the overall reconstruction effort. They gain financial support from drug interests. They threaten them with death or other bodily harm if they teach, go to school, register to vote or assist the election process, or appear to side with the government." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: WashingtonTimes. "Afghanistan's Critical Election" October 8, 2004.


2004: "This election had two major messages. First, Afghans believe they have a right to participate in their government, that it's their legacy after 30 years of violence," said Thomas E. Gouttierre, who just returned from Kabul and directs the University of Nebraska's Center for Afghanistan Studies. "The results will also carry a message to jihadis: Thanks for what you did against the Soviets, but we want to turn a new page and have another group of leaders for our future."

"This election had two major messages. First, Afghans believe they have a right to participate in their government, that it's their legacy after 30 years of violence," said Thomas E. Gouttierre, who just returned from Kabul and directs the University of Nebraska's Center for Afghanistan Studies. "The results will also carry a message to jihadis: Thanks for what you did against the Soviets, but we want to turn a new page and have another group of leaders for our future." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Washington Post. "Election Touted As Model For Iraq -- To A Point" October 12, 2004.


2004: More Muslim countries ask for Peace Corps Volunteers

In 2002, on his first visit to Afghanistan just weeks after military action had ended, Vasquez met Sima Samar, the deputy prime minister of the interim government who was also the minister of women's affairs. Samar, he said, shared the concept, the vision and mission of the Peace Corps. The last time the Peace Corps was there, she said, she was able to learn English with its volunteers' assistance. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: MENFN. "Muslim Countries Ask For Peace Corps" October 15, 2004.


2004: Ron Milos publishes first novel - "The Kush" It is part science fiction and is based in part on Peace Corps years (69 -70) in Afghanistan

Peace Corps Volunteer Greg Sobieski thinks something is happening in the Hindu Kush Mountain involving blue radiance, sickness, and death. No one believes him, not the Peace Corps and certainly not the Afghans who view foreigners as incompetent and stupid. While investigating, a massive earthquake occurs. Greg is assumed dead and Russia invades Afghanistan. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Publish America. ""The Kush" Is Part Science Fiction And Is Based In Part On Ron Milos' Peace Corps Yers (69 -70) In Afghanistan." October 20, 2004.


2004: RPCV Barry Rosen left Manhattan last month for Afghanistan, next door to Iran, where he was held hostage for 444 days in 1979. Rosen is determined to recapture something that was taken from him more than two decades ago: his overseas life

"Why would a 60-year-old man want to be in Afghanistan?" Rosen says in a telephone interview from his now- grown son's house in Washingtonville, N.Y., the day before he returned to the country where he's been working for almost a year now, helping to write textbooks for Afghan students with themes of peace and conflict resolution. "It's my way of saying to myself, 'I want to do something that I feel is real and palpable, to be out there rather than sitting behind a desk now and retiring.' This is something of that part of my life." That part of his life. Today, the former hostages see that part of their lives in different ways. A number say their time held captive is relegated to the distant past. "How much do I think about it?" asks former hostage Kathryn Koob, who continued in the foreign service at posts in cities such as Vienna and Munich after her release and is now an adjunct professor at Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa. "It was less than 1/60th of my life. It was 25 years ago. Life is too short and too busy to think about 444 days constantly." Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Newsday. "For The Americans Held Hostage In Iran For 444 Days — And Their Families — The Terrorism Of Today Holds Eerie Resonance" November 4, 2004.


2004: After serving in the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan and hearing from a friend who served in the Peace Corps in Afghanistan, John Harty has started to collect shoes for Afghan women and children.

The program was initially kept low key, Harty said, but after finding out they could be shipped for free they started to push the idea. “We’ve gotten quite a ways on the collections,” Harty said. “We really started to push the program forward once we found out about the free shipping.” Stroade said the collection has gotten about 400 pairs of athletic shoes. “I’ve been amazed by the amount people have donated,” Stroade said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Kansas State Collegian. "K-State Group Begins Collection Drive For Shoes Destined For Afghan Women, Children" November 4, 2004.


2004: Thomas Gouttierre offers other view of Afghanistan - President Bush's assertion that 75 percent of al-Qaida leadership has been eliminated is not true, he said. "They may have eliminated 75 percent of the original (organization), but now it has metastasized, it's bigger, it's all over the world."

Thomas Gouttierre knew Afghanistan before it made headlines in America's newspapers. Before terrorists crashed into Americans' consciousness on Sept. 11, 2001, and then hid in the ancient country's rugged mountains. Before people talked of the Taliban and al-Qaida and Osama bin Laden over their breakfast cereal. He knew its history and its culture, the richness of the Persian language and how people created a wealth of beautiful poetry out of it. Poems like "The Children of Adam," which he read Saturday to participants in the fourth annual Nebraska International Multicultural Exchange Conference at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He did it to illustrate the rich culture of a country where he lived for 10 years, working as a Peace Corps volunteer. He read it because of its message. "What an excellent way to explain how important we all are to each other," said the dean of UNO's International Studies and Programs. And what an excellent way to show this group, sitting in the expansive auditorium in UNL's student union, that the essence of Afghanistan goes way beyond the headlines. "This country that we see in the headlines today, there's much, much more to it," he said. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Lincoln Journal Sta. "Expert Offers Other View Of Afghanistan" November 6, 2004.


2004: Norma Emery said she met her husband in 1967 while she was in the Peace Corps in Afghanistan, and he was a doctor tending to Peace Corps volunteers

Norma Emery said she met her husband in 1967 while she was in the Peace Corps in Afghanistan, and he was a doctor tending to Peace Corps volunteers. After the fall of the Taliban, the couple decided to return to the country to see whether they could help. Cedric Emery, a urologist with a practice in Ventura, began helping to train medical students, while Norma Emery worked at an orphanage and trained operating room personnel. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Ventura County Star. "Human Rights Efforts Honored" December 6, 2004.


2004: One of the hostages held in the American Embassy in Teheran was RPCV Barry Rosen. Years later, after 9/11, Mr. Rosen persuaded Teachers College, where he headed the press office, to resume its work of the 1970's in Afghanistan compiling school textbooks for the Ministry of Education.

Teachers College left Afghanistan after the Communist coup of 1978, but it was still remembered in Kabul and was welcomed back this year by a Ministry of Education floundering with outmoded teaching systems and a jumble of textbooks. Children have returned to school in huge numbers since the repressive Taliban government ended three years ago, highlighting gaping deficiencies in the educational system. The contribution of Teachers College is a small but important part of a multimillion-dollar international drive to revive the education system in Afghanistan. Financed by the United Nations Children's Fund, the Teachers College group is rewriting the curriculum and all primary school textbooks, including language textbooks in four local languages, while introducing a style of teaching new to Afghan teachers and students that encourages student participation. The new books will replace the outdated texts produced piecemeal in the turmoil of Afghanistan's last quarter century of conflict by international aid groups and rotating governments, the last being the Taliban, who were dislodged by American forces three years ago. The Taliban and the Communists before them each had their own ideology to press, and even the University of Nebraska, financed by the United States government, produced textbooks for Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation that are now frowned on because of their religious themes and warlike content. "This curriculum is free of ideology," Abdul Nabi Wahidi, of the Ministry of Education, said of the new books. "We just have two ideas, peace and stability, and human rights." For the team from Teachers College, this work is painstaking but often an amusing and rewarding experience, and one that requires constant improvisation. Mr. Rosen, who worked on the religious studies textbook, questioned, for instance, whether primary school boys really needed to learn how to clean their beards during religious ablutions. He lost that argument, so central is the ritual to Islamic practice, but the item was moved to the bottom of the lesson. In fact, he found an unexpected readiness from the mullahs at the Ministry of Education to allow ethical questions to be addressed in stories and to experiment with new methods to motivate students. Click this link to read more.

  • Original Source: Pak Tribune. "Afghan Students Are Back, But Not The Old Textbooks" December 28, 2004.


References

  1. The Southern. "Ben Gelman: Woman Publishes Journal While Fighting Ovarian Cancer" January 8, 2004.
  2. Honolulu Advertiser. "Lance Holter Built Wells In Tunisia In 1972-73 And Is Now A Real-Estate Broker And A Building And Plumbing Contractor On Maui. The Peace Corps, He Says, Should "Wage Peace," Not War." January 25, 2004.
  3. Boston Herald. "Obituary; Robert P, Moynihan, 62, Army Master Sergeant" January 29, 2004.
  4. Personal Web Site. "Photos From Afghanistan" February 3, 2004.
  5. Portland Tribune. "Trade Moves" February 17, 2004.
  6. C4Women. "One Left Behind" March 1, 2004.
  7. Mercury News. "A Culinary Trip To Afghanistan" March 17, 2004.
  8. VCU. "Hans Blix, Sarah Chayes To Kickoff Vcu Lecture Series" March 24, 2004.
  9. Sacramento Bee. "Middle East Talk Set" April 18, 2004.
  10. Rocky Mountain News. "Attention Turns To Arabic" April 26, 2004.
  11. Mercury News. "Journalist Turns To Afghan Aid" May 8, 2004.
  12. US Senate. "Testimony By Mark L. Schneider, Sr. Vice President, International Crisis Group, To The Senate Foreign Relations Committee On "Afghanistan – Continuing Challenges"" May 12, 2004.
  13. US Senate. "Testimony Of Thomas E. Gouttierre Dean, International Studies And Programs Director, Center For Afghanistan Studies Before The Senate Committee On Foreign Relations" May 12, 2004.
  14. Omaha World Herald. "Terrorists Put Progress At Risk In Afghanistan" May 16, 2004.
  15. Muslim Wake up. "Sarah Chayes On Afghanistan @ Stanford University" May 20, 2004.
  16. Trust in Education. "Kandahar, May 29, 2004" May 29, 2004.
  17. Saint Mary's College. "Saint Mary's Alumna Offers First-Hand Account Of Life In War-Torn Afghanistan" May 31, 2004.
  18. Baltimore Sun. "A Victory Requires Army Of Builders" June 6, 2004.
  19. Brandeton Times. "Pendulum Turning? Saudi Crackdown Is A Hopeful Sign" June 6, 2004.
  20. Charleston Post Courier. "Ceo Profile" June 7, 2004.
  21. National Association for Continence. "Program Moderator — Jennet Robinson Alterman" June 7, 2004.
  22. ABC. "Mark Schneider Is The Afghanistan Expert For The International Crisis Group, Where He’s Also Senior Vice-President. Mr Schneider Has Recently Testified Before The Us Senate On The Situation In Afghanistan And He Spoke To Me A Short Time Ago From Washington." June 10, 2004.
  23. LA Times. "Karzai Applauds Washington, Where The Feeling Is Mutual" June 16, 2004.
  24. Omaha World Herald. "Brotherly Love From Nebraska Sister City" June 20, 2004.
  25. Beaver County Times. "Beaver Native Finds Work In Afghanistan 'Rewarding'" June 27, 2004.
  26. Philadelphia Inquirer. "Karzai, Lacking Support, Struggles To Fulfill Vision" July 4, 2004.
  27. Baltimore Sun. "His Next Call To Serve" July 7, 2004.
  28. Aspen Times. "Barbee: 'Empower' The People" July 16, 2004.
  29. Baltimore Sun. "Aid Group Pulls Out Of Afghanistan" July 29, 2004.
  30. Reno Gazette-Journal. "Former Teacher Takes Over As Interim Leader" August 2, 2004.
  31. Fort Wayne Journal Gazette. "Afghan Teens Coming To Learn – And Educate" August 4, 2004.
  32. San Francisco Chronicle. "Larry Wonderling" August 20, 2004.
  33. Sudan Tribune. "Save Lives With Force" August 26, 2004.
  34. VOA News. "Analysts: Aid Effectiveness Dependent On Security In Post-Conflict Societies" August 26, 2004.
  35. Current. "Without A Parachute" September 20, 2004.
  36. Rug Review. "An Irishman In Friendly Disguise" October 2, 2004.
  37. Argus Online. "Millican Retires After 18 Years" October 6, 2004.
  38. WashingtonTimes. "Afghanistan's Critical Election" October 8, 2004.
  39. Washington Post. "Election Touted As Model For Iraq -- To A Point" October 12, 2004.
  40. MENFN. "Muslim Countries Ask For Peace Corps" October 15, 2004.
  41. Publish America. ""The Kush" Is Part Science Fiction And Is Based In Part On Ron Milos' Peace Corps Yers (69 -70) In Afghanistan." October 20, 2004.
  42. Newsday. "For The Americans Held Hostage In Iran For 444 Days — And Their Families — The Terrorism Of Today Holds Eerie Resonance" November 4, 2004.
  43. Kansas State Collegian. "K-State Group Begins Collection Drive For Shoes Destined For Afghan Women, Children" November 4, 2004.
  44. Lincoln Journal Sta. "Expert Offers Other View Of Afghanistan" November 6, 2004.
  45. Ventura County Star. "Human Rights Efforts Honored" December 6, 2004.
  46. Pak Tribune. "Afghan Students Are Back, But Not The Old Textbooks" December 28, 2004.
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